Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Livestock water level switch recommendations

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Livestock water level switch recommendations

    I will be trenching and installing frost-proof waterline between a shallow well with a PV pump installation and a stock tank in a passive solar (earth banked) shelter located 730 ft away. I'm looking for recommendations on level switches that would be suitable and long term reliable for this job.

    I tried doing it mechanically with a small bladder tank and pressure switch located at the well, but as the float valve closed it just chattered until it overflows, or it doesn't come on, depending on settings. Since there is the opportunity to run hard wire I would like to do this right.

    The PV system uses (2) Dasol DS-A-18-90 panels, running at 24V through a Midnite solar combiner then a Shurflo 9300 Best Pump controller.

    The level sensor is on a 120 gallon trough and system flow is only about 4-5gpm. It will be protected from cows but needs to withstand icing up, dirty water, etc.

    There's so many options out there some help in narrowing down would be appreciated. This is the one DC system I deal with (other than equipment) and I'm less familiar with this world than AC stuff, I know exactly how I'd do it there!

    Thanks

    #2
    My local pump installer says he uses a simple float switch on his solar stock wells and tanks.
    Tom
    TBLO

    Comment


      #3
      I formerly ran Surface Water treatment and Field irrigation systems at a decent sized Ranch. Some of what is required depends on the band of the level you want to control. In that case we were dealing with several different sized bodies of water and used the tether type float switches. For smaller containers of water with not too much level change, Warrick conductivity controllers work well. These are what I use for Boiler Makeup water feed systems. Typically you set them up with 3 rods. One is ground reference , and then you have High and Low Level.If you are filling a vessel you use a reverse acting control. From there your low level rod initiates fill and your high level rod terminates fill. The sensing rods are available in stock lengths and can be cut in the field. The Module is an Octal type that plugs into a typical base.
      I have used them on both large and small systems. If you have an arrangement that tends towards short cycling that needs to be factored in. I think there are time delay options available as well. Mechanically you need to Engineer for stability that will carry over to the Electrical side.
      Attached Files
      Microwave Poison will be seen to be a Trillion times worse than Asbestos.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by StarCat View Post
        I formerly ran Surface Water treatment and Field irrigation systems at a decent sized Ranch. Some of what is required depends on the band of the level you want to control. In that case we were dealing with several different sized bodies of water and used the tether type float switches. For smaller containers of water with not too much level change, Warrick conductivity controllers work well. These are what I use for Boiler Makeup water feed systems. Typically you set them up with 3 rods. One is ground reference , and then you have High and Low Level.If you are filling a vessel you use a reverse acting control. From there your low level rod initiates fill and your high level rod terminates fill. The sensing rods are available in stock lengths and can be cut in the field. The Module is an Octal type that plugs into a typical base.
        I have used them on both large and small systems. If you have an arrangement that tends towards short cycling that needs to be factored in. I think there are time delay options available as well. Mechanically you need to Engineer for stability that will carry over to the Electrical side.
        Are those controls available for DC? I quickly looked over the Gem Sensor and only saw AC systems. Also, I'll need something with little amp draw with the distance involved. Not sure if a conductivity switch will fit that, might be I need to look into floats, since the water provides the switching power in that case.

        Comment


          #5
          Warrick controls work very well, but think of who will be maintaining it.

          That float switch is pretty uncomplicated.

          Tom
          TBLO

          Comment

          Working...
          X