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    DC Current on Sink in Kitchen

    Need some help
    At a friends place his girl friend gets shock at least twice a day from the kitchen sink. With power on in the house he reads .32 vdc on a digital meter to ground. Turning all power off at the main he still reads .32vdc on his meter. We have checked every thing and are at a loss to were it is coming from, Open for suggestions Thanks
    Last edited by roger; 02-27-15, 05:30 AM.

    #2
    IIRC from "stray voltage" @ dairys, .32 volt is getting to the limits of what most of us can detect. Cows are about .5v but they usually have more points of contact than humans and they are wet.

    What is she touching when she feels this shock and how long is the shock sustained? Is she willing to hold on while you put a meter across her points of contact to determine voltage under load?
    Tom
    TBLO

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      #3
      What does the meter show when set to read AC? If she puts her fingers across the ends of a D size battery can she feel the voltage? I think it would be rare for a person to be able to feel 0.32 volts.
      Don, Illinois
      (All code citations are 2017 unless otherwise noted)

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        #4
        In plug the disposal. Then disconnect the hot water under the sink. Then disconnect the cold water. If that doesn't lead you to something ground the sink?
        The hardest faults to clear are mine

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          #5
          Originally posted by don_resqcapt19 View Post
          What does the meter show when set to read AC? If she puts her fingers across the ends of a D size battery can she feel the voltage? I think it would be rare for a person to be able to feel 0.32 volts.
          I agree. Maybe we don't have the whole story.
          Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

          Comment


            #6
            Odds are that she touches the sink far more often than twice a day. So I would approach the situation from the perspective of, "why does she not feel a shock the other times?" For example, does the shock happen only when,
            - The dishwasher is running?
            - The disposal is running?
            - The hot water is running?
            - The cold water is running?
            - No water is running?
            - The sink has water in it?
            - She is also touching the toaster?
            - She is using the sink's hose to fill the coffee maker?

            I would suggest speaking with her, and getting her to try to remember the details of the times she felt a shock. In the meantime, I would suggest to her (and to your friend) that before doing anything with the sink, touch it first with the back of your hand. The reason is that if the shock takes place, it will cause the hand and arm muscles to contract, thereby pulling the hand away from the sink. I might also suggest to your friend that if he wishes to keep this person as his girlfriend, that he start volunteering to do the dishes.

            Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
            Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

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              #7
              Originally posted by electricalist View Post
              In plug the disposal.
              I think you meant "unplug."
              Originally posted by electricalist View Post
              If that doesn't lead you to something ground the sink?
              What do you expect grounding the sink to accomplish?

              Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
              Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

              Comment


                #8
                Auto correct.
                If there is voltage on the sink and it stops shocking her when it's connected to an e.g. then it might help determine the cause or if nothing else not shock her. 32 volts is pretty low.
                The hardest faults to clear are mine

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                  #9
                  Is this an apartment complex? Do they have motion water dispensing?
                  Does she walk around with rubber flip flops? I do most of the year and I
                  get zapped pretty good on SS counters...
                  Last edited by cadpoint; 02-27-15, 01:57 PM.
                  If you are even thirsty, you are two quarts low.

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                    #10
                    I can wave my meter probes around in the air and read .32VDC...

                    Oh and just to be pedantic, you are measuring a DC VOLTAGE potential, not DC current. Your meter would have to be in series with the woman and the sink to be able to read current.

                    I too think this is much more likely to be static discharge. Winter time, dry air, vinyl flooring or laminate flooring will make that worse. I put some of that fake wood looking laminate flooring in my kitchen a few years ago and now when it's dry outside, I get zapped almost every time I touch the sink.

                    That's why I tell my wife I'm not doing the dishes...
                    __________________________________________________ ____________________________
                    Many people are shocked when they discover I am not a good electrician...

                    I'm in California, ergo I am still stuck on the 2014 NEC... We'll get around to the 2017 code in around 2021.

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                      #11
                      When my wife gets a little shock like that I tell her it must be because she's hot....no dishes for me either atleast for that day
                      The hardest faults to clear are mine

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Jraef View Post
                        I can wave my meter probes around in the air and read .32VDC...

                        Oh and just to be pedantic, you are measuring a DC VOLTAGE potential, not DC current.
                        Don't think current was mentioned.
                        This from the OP:
                        .32 vdc
                        Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

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                          #13
                          The title of the post is DC current at kitchen sink.
                          The hardest faults to clear are mine

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by electricalist View Post
                            The title of the post is DC current at kitchen sink.
                            I stand corrected, thank you.
                            Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              No need to thank me. I TS not often I'm right about something on here.
                              Maybe my calling is proofreading.
                              The hardest faults to clear are mine

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