Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Qualified Personnel in control cabinet

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Qualified Personnel in control cabinet

    In a control cabinet that has both line voltage (120v or greater) and low voltage (less than 50 volts) when can a low voltage or limited power tech work without supervision? It is my understanding that if there is a barrier that separates or protects against exposure to line voltage the low voltage tech can work unsupervised. With any exposure to line voltage you must have a electrical license or be supervised by a licensed electrician. Does this sound right?

    #2
    Originally posted by nietzj View Post
    In a control cabinet that has both line voltage (120v or greater) and low voltage (less than 50 volts) when can a low voltage or limited power tech work without supervision? It is my understanding that if there is a barrier that separates or protects against exposure to line voltage the low voltage tech can work unsupervised. With any exposure to line voltage you must have a electrical license or be supervised by a licensed electrician. Does this sound right?
    There is no single set of national rules that govern this situation.
    Generally standards like OSHA and NFPA simply require workers to be "Qualified" for the tasks they are performing. It is up to each company to create an Electrical Safe Work Practices program which establishes their own requirements. Simply 'being licensed' will rarely be viewed by OSHA as equal to 'being qualified".
    Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by jim dungar View Post
      There is no single set of national rules that govern this situation.
      Generally standards like OSHA and NFPA simply require workers to be "Qualified" for the tasks they are performing. It is up to each company to create an Electrical Safe Work Practices program which establishes their own requirements. Simply 'being licensed' will rarely be viewed by OSHA as equal to 'being qualified".
      Thanks Jim,
      I do understand there are electricians who may have acquired their license under questionable circumstances but generally speaking a class A journeyman is in my opinion qualified. As for the PLT license that includes everything from landscapers and carpenters to highly skilled limited energy techs.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by nietzj View Post
        Thanks Jim,
        I do understand there are electricians who may have acquired their license under questionable circumstances but generally speaking a class A journeyman is in my opinion qualified. As for the PLT license that includes everything from landscapers and carpenters to highly skilled limited energy techs.
        Please read the definition of Qualified, found in the NEC, NFPA 70E, and various OSHA standards. You will find that none of them use the word electrician, much less licensed or journeyman.
        It is up to your company to determine the requirements for qualification based on the task being performed.
        Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by nietzj View Post
          In a control cabinet that has both line voltage (120v or greater) and low voltage (less than 50 volts) when can a low voltage or limited power tech work without supervision?
          Why would it matter what the guy's job title is? Unless it is a union thing.

          Originally posted by nietzj View Post
          It is my understanding that if there is a barrier that separates or protects against exposure to line voltage the low voltage tech can work unsupervised.
          This could be a union or company rule.

          Originally posted by nietzj View Post
          With any exposure to line voltage you must have a electrical license or be supervised by a licensed electrician. Does this sound right?
          This could also be a union or company rule.

          There is no electrocution hazard if an employee is not exposed to hazardous voltages. Since < 50V is not considered hazardous, pretty much any one can work on it without PPE for dealing with an electrocution hazard, short of a contractual situation or employer's rule.

          The thing is that regardless of job title, the exact same PPE is required as is the exact same determination that the employee is "qualified" to perform the work.
          Last edited by petersonra; 03-18-15, 08:24 PM.
          Bob

          Comment


            #6

            Comment

            Working...
            X