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2018 NFPA 70E

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    2018 NFPA 70E

    What is currently required to work in a 120/208 volt breaker panel?
    we just need to add a conduit, install wire and connect to an existing breaker.

    #2
    You need to shut it down unless there is some justification for doing that work energized.

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      #3
      And you still need to suit up when verifying that it isn't energized.
      I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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        #4
        PPE

        The first thing to do Jim is to figure out what PPE to wear. If it has an arc flash label, dress to cover the incident energy level while interacting with the panel energized, like when taking the covers off, or for verification of the absence of voltage.
        If it's not labelled, then you need to figure out what PPE to wear from Table 130.7(C)(15)(a). You really only have the first line to work with, and if you meet the fault current max of 25kA, and the clearing time of 2 cycles, then it's PPE 1.

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          #5
          Originally posted by mayanees View Post
          The first thing to do Jim is to figure out what PPE to wear. If it has an arc flash label, dress to cover the incident energy level while interacting with the panel energized, like when taking the covers off, or for verification of the absence of voltage.
          If it's not labelled, then you need to figure out what PPE to wear from Table 130.7(C)(15)(a). You really only have the first line to work with, and if you meet the fault current max of 25kA, and the clearing time of 2 cycles, then it's PPE 1.
          that's what I got from it, thanks for the confirmation.

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            #6
            I know this is Florida ! I talk to younger electricians and they still work things hot . There's still the hurry up mentality , everything's not being done fast enough . Some say their company's policy is "No Hot Work " but then say how they feel pressed to get it done .

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              #7
              Originally posted by Davebones View Post
              I know this is Florida ! I talk to younger electricians and they still work things hot . There's still the hurry up mentality , everything's not being done fast enough . Some say their company's policy is "No Hot Work " but then say how they feel pressed to get it done .
              So the unwritten policy is don't get caught and don't get hurt.
              I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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                #8
                Originally posted by Davebones View Post
                I know this is Florida ! I talk to younger electricians and they still work things hot
                ...because young folks think it can't happen to them, and even if it does, they'll come out OK. Funny how OSHA's been around since 1970 and 70E got hot on arc flash and energized electrical work in 2004, and lots of folks still don't get it--even when they know an old-timer who's been seriously burned (which happens way more often than fatalities).

                I used to tell people, when I caught them without their PPE, it's not about safety, it's about your contract. Put it on, and be glad your contract doesn't require you to wear a tuxedo.

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