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    elctric heat in airport hanger

    Is this possible? If so , how would you approach it?

    #2
    Originally posted by mortimer View Post
    Is this possible? If so , how would you approach it?
    As long as you have power and a heater to plug in, yes!
    If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

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      #3
      In-floor heating? What are you trying to warm up?
      Master Electrician
      Electrical Contractor
      Richmond, VA

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by LarryFine View Post
        In-floor heating? What are you trying to warm up?
        The hanger.

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          #5
          Originally posted by mortimer View Post
          The hanger.
          You need to give us more information if you expect any kind of reasonable answer.
          Sounds like you need to involve an HVAC person and coordinate with them on power requirements.
          If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

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            #6
            Originally posted by mortimer View Post
            Is this possible? If so , how would you approach it?
            Unless you own your own power plant, have access to Bill Gates' money, or a sure-fire way to counterfeit US currency, this would be my current top pick for Bad Idea of the Year.

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              #7
              Possible, yes.

              Practical, most of the time no.

              Heat pump - entirely electric source, but more cost efficient to operate than resistance heat.

              You didn't mention if this is a hanger for a small single engine plane or a hanger for a 747 or something in between either though.
              I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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                #8
                Most 'open-air' kinds of places (like auto repair garages) use infra-red heaters mounted near the ceiling, aiming at the area below. Some are electric, some are gas. But they don't try to heat the air, they try to heat the objects (ie people) below.

                Given that most garages (and hangers) have large, uninsulated doors, that may not seal tightly against the wind, heating the air is a futile exercise.

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                  #9
                  Load Calculation

                  Originally posted by mortimer View Post
                  Is this possible? If so , how would you approach it?
                  This would seemingly be a massive KW load depending on the size of the structure and the difference to outside temp you want to try and maintain.
                  I have never been involved with service on that kind of structure, but I would expect that the convention is not electric. If it has to be done this way I would expect forced air is how it will be done. If I had a load calculation in hand I would speak to an outfit like Trane or Carrier on details for equipment. The design criteria for this type of structure would need to be investigated in detail.
                  Microwave Radiation Dangers should be openly discussed

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                    #10
                    It might also involve hazard classification due to the presence of jet fuel and/or aviation gasoline.

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                      #11
                      Across the highway from my shop is a runway for an Ag spray plane service. Jock has infloor hydronic heat. It works great. He sets the heat at 65 degrees. This is probably a 10,000 sf hangar.

                      If something comes inside that’s wet, it and the floor are dry in an hour or two. If your doing mechanical work on the floor it’s comfortable. Every winter he hosts a hanger dance. Nobody has to wear a coat inside the hangar. Outside, that’s a different story.

                      as previously mentioned, the other option is radiant heaters. They heat objects, not the air.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by mortimer View Post
                        Is this possible? If so , how would you approach it?
                        I can do it. Who's paying?

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by PaulMmn View Post
                          Most 'open-air' kinds of places (like auto repair garages) use infra-red heaters mounted near the ceiling, aiming at the area below. Some are electric, some are gas. But they don't try to heat the air, they try to heat the objects (ie people) below.
                          They're called "radiant heaters." It works the same way the Sun does: it has little direct effect on the temperature of the air, but it makes you feel warm. The air temperature is impacted more by reflected heat from the ground than by sunlight passing through the air. Just think of the difference between standing in the direct sunlight and stepping one foot away and finding yourself in shade. The air temperature is the same in both locations, but the way you feel is vastly different.

                          We are working on several projects that use this heating system, including a vehicle maintenance facility. There is a concern over combustible materials being too close to the heater. But each heater has a zone of influence within which there is a potential flammability hazard, and outside of which there is not. So there is a design task involved in selecting and placing the heaters.

                          Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
                          Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

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