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    Rubber Gloves and Leather Protectors

    I have recently relocated from NY to NC. Am working in a shop where they don't believe in wearing leather protectors over their L.V. rubber gloves. I've tried ASTM F-696-97, OSHA 1910.335 (a) and NFPA 70-E and none of them specifically state a requirement for wearing leather protection over rubber. The codes all state: shall, may or should. I'm from an electrical family and not wearing leather "keepers" is unheard of. I've also tried explaining that there are other hazards besides puncturing the rubber glove. Abrasion, chemical contamination, not to mention heat during an Arc Flash. I would appreciate some input on this as I can't seem to convince to brother electricians of the unnecessary risks they are subjecting themselves to. Thanks all and have a great day.

    #2
    What about some info from the glove manufacturer?
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

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      #3
      Originally posted by Spark_797 View Post
      I have recently relocated from NY to NC. Am working in a shop where they don't believe in wearing leather protectors over their L.V. rubber gloves. I've tried ASTM F-696-97, OSHA 1910.335 (a) and NFPA 70-E and none of them specifically state a requirement for wearing leather protection over rubber. The codes all state: shall, may or should. I'm from an electrical family and not wearing leather "keepers" is unheard of. I've also tried explaining that there are other hazards besides puncturing the rubber glove. Abrasion, chemical contamination, not to mention heat during an Arc Flash. I would appreciate some input on this as I can't seem to convince to brother electricians of the unnecessary risks they are subjecting themselves to. Thanks all and have a great day.
      OSHA 1910.137 (b)(2)(vii) Protector gloves shall be worn over insulating gloves, except as follows:
      (b)(2)(vii)(A) Protector gloves need not be used with Class 0 gloves, under limited-use conditions, where small equipment and parts manipulation necessitate unusually high finger dexterity.
      Note: Extra care is needed in the visual examination of the glove and in the avoidance of handling sharp objects.


      "Shall" means you must, and is enforceable.

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        #4
        In addition, the NFPA 70E requires leather gloves for most tasks on energized equipment as arc flash PPE.

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          #5
          Protect yourself explain to the others the necessity of being safe, but in the end you can only be responsibility for yourself. As for rubber with protectors, protectors will be of little use in an ARC flash other than to melt.


          ZOG? rubber in regards to Arc flash?
          Brian John
          Leesburg, VA

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            #6
            Originally posted by brian john View Post
            Protect yourself explain to the others the necessity of being safe, but in the end you can only be responsibility for yourself. As for rubber with protectors, protectors will be of little use in an ARC flash other than to melt.
            Actually your leather protectors are a great glove to use for arc flash protection, and are the recommended leather glove to use in the 70E. They cant get an arc rating because thee isnt a ASTM standard for acheving an APTV rating for leather gloves, yet.


            Originally posted by brian john View Post
            ZOG? rubber in regards to Arc flash?
            Witnesed some testing on this and I was amazed at the arc flash protection that rubber gloves did provide, again, no ASTM standard for a test of these but they help up pretty good. Hugh Hogland has done a bunch of thee tests and could provide you with some more info if you want. I think thee is some test data from this in his newsletter archives. http://arcwear.com/arcwear.com/archives.htm

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              #7
              I have heard conflicting information on both sides Rubber melts....Rubber provides additional protection when used in conjunction with liners and leather.
              Brian John
              Leesburg, VA

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                #8
                Originally posted by brian john View Post
                I have heard conflicting information on both sides Rubber melts....Rubber provides additional protection when used in conjunction with liners and leather.
                Well rubber does melt, but it takes alot more than you would think, and on the other hand they do offer additional protection. Dont believe what you hear from anyone, read the test data. Most people are just blowing smoke when they say stuff like that.

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                  #9
                  Anecdotaly, I have seen many photos of arms injured during arc flash events except for the forearms that were protected only by rubber gloves.
                  Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

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                    #10
                    For the heck of it I will post..... When inspecting live work I wear 14" cuff Salibury 10kv rubber gloves and Green Mountain goat skin cover gloves 14" cuff as well. The prefered choice of Linemen.
                    Greg

                    [COLOR="Blue"]Electrical Inspector in our Nations Capital[/COLOR]

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by dcspector View Post
                      For the heck of it I will post..... When inspecting live work I wear 14" cuff Salibury 10kv rubber gloves and Green Mountain goat skin cover gloves 14" cuff as well. The prefered choice of Linemen.
                      First, there is no suck thing as a 10kV glove.

                      2nd, there is a required distance between the leather protector and the end of the cuff of the rubber, the distance depends on the class of glove. Using a 14" glove and 14" protector is dangerous and an OSHA violation.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by zog View Post
                        there is a required distance between the leather protector and the end of the cuff of the rubber, the distance depends on the class of glove. Using a 14" glove and 14" protector is dangerous and an OSHA violation.
                        yeah, for the same reason you have the outer jacket on a MV or HV cable
                        is stripped back a prescribed length, depending on the voltage.
                        ~New signature under construction.~
                        ~~~~Please excuse the mess.~~~~

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                          #13
                          Uh.....um.....yep.....Im pretty sure that "shall" means your gonna do it....whether you wanna or not!!!

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                            #14
                            Are there preferred manufactures for gloves? Styles used for general everyday needs? I need some recommendations. My exposure typically involves working on switchgear no higher than 480 volts.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Duke E View Post
                              Are there preferred manufactures for gloves? Styles used for general everyday needs? I need some recommendations. My exposure typically involves working on switchgear no higher than 480 volts.
                              Class O gloves are rated for up to 1,000V and would be a good fit. There is only 1 major manufacturer now in the U.S., Salisbury, they bought out thier competetion about 2 years ago (White rubber).

                              But I have to ask, what are you doing working on live switchgear? You have bigger problems than not having gloves.

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