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Thread: Home Inspectors and GFCI's

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlnk View Post
    You have tested a GFCI and it would not reset? This has never happened to me in over 30 years. And this is the bizarre opening story to your pamphlet?
    I have run across several GFCI breakers and recetacles that would not reset once tripped. I have also run across several that would trip with a cheap tester but would not trip with the test button on the device.

  2. #22
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    I had a customer [newly installed circuit] that plugged his computer into the GFCI protected circuit, and he said it tripped the gfci almost every time when he turned it on.

    So I show up, push test/reset, test the circuit with my T+Pro.. everythign seems to work fine. he turned his computer on, right in front of me and it tripped the gfci!

    I replaced the gfci and havent had any callbacks and it has been many months.

    Basically; sometimes it can just be a issue with the gfci.

    ~Matt
    I would rather beg for forgiveness then beg for permission.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TOOL_5150 View Post
    I had a customer [newly installed circuit] that plugged his computer into the GFCI protected circuit, and he said it tripped the GFCI almost every time when he turned it on.

    So I show up, push test/reset, test the circuit with my T+Pro.. everything seems to work fine. he turned his computer on, right in front of me and it tripped the GFCI!

    I replaced the GFCI and haven't had any callbacks and it has been many months.

    Basically; sometimes it can just be a issue with the GFCI.

    ~Matt
    I have had surge strips also trip GFCI's, most have MOV's between the hot and ground, and if there at End Of Life, they can cause leakage.

    and have a motor load on a circuit with TVSS also and most will trip a GFCI with the inductive kick back, but remove the TVSS and it goes away.

    so now I try to tell HO's to look for surge protectors without the hot to ground MOV's when using on GFCI protected circuits.

    I never understood why they have a hot to ground MOV since there is no load to protect?:confused:
    Wayne A. From: N.W.Indiana
    Be Fair, Be Safe
    Just don't be fairly safe

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by hurk27 View Post
    I have had surge strips also trip GFCI's, most have MOV's between the hot and ground, and if there at End Of Life, they can cause leakage.

    and have a motor load on a circuit with TVSS also and most will trip a GFCI with the inductive kick back, but remove the TVSS and it goes away.

    so now I try to tell HO's to look for surge protectors without the hot to ground MOV's when using on GFCI protected circuits.

    I never understood why they have a hot to ground MOV since there is no load to protect?:confused:
    I believe the intent of the shunted MOV is to maintain the strip at a maximum let-through voltage. rbj
    rbj, Seattle...Safety is a Professional Courtesy.

  5. #25
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    The subject pamphlet talked about a GFCI that was somehow damaged by pushing the test button and then the re-set button then did not work. I think this is a very, very rare occurrence and do not see how it could ever happen, but I am ready to hear an explanation.
    I still say to introduce an article on GFCIs with this bizarre example is misleading for the reader.
    Of course GFCIs get tripped and will not work. I had three of them that were struck by lightning ! and would not re-set. We are talking about pushing the test button-testing...not tripping.
    Also, when I have GFCI units that do not function, I return them and receive FREE replacements.

  6. #26
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    The 2008 Code does not require GFCI for refers in kitchen so I will continue to use and recommend standard outlets. It does require GFCI for garage refers so I will install an individual GFCI for a dedicated refer/freezer garage outlet.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by gndrod View Post
    I believe the intent of the shunted MOV is to maintain the strip at a maximum let-through voltage. rbj
    I could buy that, with two MOV's basically in parallel, just with two different return paths, one through the EGC and one through the grounded conductor.

    But Why? from what I see most all damage is done in normal mode transient voltage, common mode has no load to damage, let them put two parallel MOV's between the Hot and Neutral, leave the EGC alone. there are a few manufactures getting away from common mode protection when the SPD's are at point of use, I think its great.

    Again there is no load to protect in common mode, at least there should not be. so why protect it?
    Wayne A. From: N.W.Indiana
    Be Fair, Be Safe
    Just don't be fairly safe

  8. #28
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    Using 210.8(A)(5) I would have to GFCI protect a frig. in an unfinished basement.

    In Ohio habitable includes eating or cooking areas.

    So using 210.(A)(6), and reading the handbook commentary, I would not have to GFCI protect a frig. in a kitchen in a basement.

    Assume a concrete floor in the basement kitchen and unfinished area.

    I do not know how to explain to a contractor or homeowner why one is required and one is not. Just saying it is code is not good enough.

    Any ideas? Was this really the intent?
    Inspector Mike
    ESI

  9. #29
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    Thumbs up Great article

    Quote Originally Posted by badbrad View Post
    I would really like some opinions regarding my article before I submit it for publishing. . .
    Brad, I have read some very good comments and your article is outstanding, especially the lead in story.

    Assuming you are going to revise the article a little, would you post the revised edition? It is so well written that I would like to keep it for future reference.

    Thanks for posting.
    Charlie Eldridge, Indianapolis, Utility Power Guy
    Responses based on the 2011 NEC, unless stated otherwise.

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