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Thread: Equipment Bonding Jumper verses Equipment Grounding Conductor

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    Equipment Bonding Jumper verses Equipment Grounding Conductor

    The way I understand it the EGC is the basic effective ground fault current path and the EBJ is in addition to the EGC.
    Two questions I had were:
    Is the EBJ optional? Engineered in to provide a more effective ground fault current path?
    Is the EBJ a EGC?

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    I like this question because it will probably get answers that clarify alot of misunderstanding...
    Im only stating my understanding.
    A bonding jumper is the connection between 2 things making thing nechanically conplete.
    Bonding jumpers have to happen for it to be complete..The confusion for me was a bonding jumper can be the screw that connects a lug assembly to the enclosure like in a service disconnect,,,,still i see a wire type jumper from that lug assembly to the enclosure all the time even when rhe green screw in installed. Also it could be the ground stinger from a device to the box...It depends on the grounding method when they are necessary..
    At the service the ground bushing will be there alomg with a wire bonding jumper as safe guard that it is all connected..im sure those who know will clarify it..
    The hardest faults to clear are mine

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    The NEC definition is:

    Bonding Jumper, Equipment.

    The connection between two or more portions of the equipment grounding conductor

    One example that comes to mind would be a jumper installed between connectors on a piece of Flexible Metal Conduit to continue the ground path.
    In that case, IMO, the EBJ would be also acting as an EGC.

    In some cases the EBJ is required such as in the example above (see 501.30), but I guess you are always welcome to add one when not required.


    Last edited by augie47; 02-21-15 at 03:40 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by vergeront View Post
    Is the EBJ a EGC?
    To me they are because they are there to make sure a fault gets cleared.

    An EGC is usually thought of as wire or metal conduit while an EBJ is added to make sure the fault gets to the EGC so the fault gets cleared.
    If you don't think too good, don't think too much.

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    EBJ verses EGC

    Thank you and keep the replies coming
    I instruct 3rd year IBEW apprentices and your input is helping me to answer their questions.
    I have been teaching this grounding and bonding for 20 years and alot of changes have happened to Article 250.
    Thank you for your assistance in this EBJ verses EGC.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vergeront View Post
    The way I understand it the EGC is the basic effective ground fault current path and the EBJ is in addition to the EGC.
    Two questions I had were:
    Is the EBJ optional? Engineered in to provide a more effective ground fault current path?
    Is the EBJ a EGC?
    I think it can be a little murky as to the difference, if there is one, in some situations. Consider a 4 square box with a receptacle mounted on a raised cover with dimpled corners. No jumper is required from the box to the recep. IF you install one, what is it called? BJ, EBJ, and EGC all seem to work as a definition IMO. Another example: consider two metal raceway systems without a wire EGC, with a nonmetallic conduit between them (box on each end with the wire EGC in the nonmetallic raceway bonded to the box at each end). Is that wire EGC in fact an EBJ? Again I dont think its clear, or its both. I would have to think about it a little more to be sure, but I think we could get by without the term EBJ, just having BJ and EGC.
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

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    Quote Originally Posted by electrofelon View Post
    ...but I think we could get by without the term EBJ, just having BJ and EGC.
    I think that we would be better served by getting rid of the term EGC and replacing it with the term EBJ. (I submitted proposals for the for the 2005 code. The proposals were accepted by a majority of the members of CMP 5, but were one vote short of the 2/3s majority that is required to report a proposal as accepted.)

    The use of the word grounding in the term EGC leads many to believe that the function of that conductor is to make a connection to the earth, but that is not the function of the EGC. It is function is to bond the non-current carrying parts of the electrical system back to the main or system bonding jumper.
    Don, Illinois
    (All code citations are 2017 unless otherwise noted)

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    Quote Originally Posted by don_resqcapt19 View Post
    I think that we would be better served by getting rid of the term EGC and replacing it with the term EBJ. (I submitted proposals for the for the 2005 code. The proposals were accepted by a majority of the members of CMP 5, but were one vote short of the 2/3s majority that is required to report a proposal as accepted.)

    The use of the word grounding in the term EGC leads many to believe that the function of that conductor is to make a connection to the earth, but that is not the function of the EGC. It is function is to bond the non-current carrying parts of the electrical system back to the main or system bonding jumper.
    That is a separate discussion, but yes I am totally in agreement with you on that.
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

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    wow....thanks for all the response

    Thanks for all the response this should keep me and my electrical apprentices busy for awhile.
    yours
    LV

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    Quote Originally Posted by vergeront View Post
    Thank you and keep the replies coming
    I instruct 3rd year IBEW apprentices and your input is helping me to answer their questions.
    I have been teaching this grounding and bonding for 20 years and alot of changes have happened to Article 250.
    Thank you for your assistance in this EBJ verses EGC.
    Do you think teaching 250 is easier given the changes or harder?
    If you don't think too good, don't think too much.

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