User Tag List

Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Grounding electrode/ Grounding conductor sizing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    20
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Grounding electrode/ Grounding conductor sizing

    can anyone really dumb down the grounding of services and transformers. im wondering when i use which table, i remember one is for service and one is for equipment ground but can you dumb it down? when pulling wires to feed a new panel which table? when pulling wires to a meter socket or to feed a meter socket which panel? when do you change to the equipment table? after a breaker? but what if there is a main breaker? how do you size the primary and secondary ground for a transformer and the bonding jumper and the wire for building steel? i know its a very broad and extensive question but i could use some help understanding this. thanks alot

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    27,228
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    T250.66 is for service main bonding jumpers and grounding electrode conductors (GEC).
    T250.122 is for EGC's which are sized based on the OCPD ahead of the branch circuit or feeder.
    T250.102(C) is for transformer system bonding jumpers (SBJ), supply side bonding jumpers (SSBJ)and GEC's.

    Take a look at the heading and notes for each table.
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    16,576
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A somewhat simple rule I tell guys to follow is to ask yourself if there is an overcurrent device directly protecting the associated phase wires. If the wires are protected by a fuse or breaker, then 250.122 is used based on that fuse/breaker size. If there is no overcurrent protection, such as the secondary of a transformer or service wires from a meter socket, then 250.66 is your guide.

    Not 100% fool-proof but pretty close.
    At my age, I'm accustomed to restaurants asking me to pay in advance, but now my bank has started sending me their calendar one month at a time.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    US
    Posts
    48
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Generally the grounding electrode conductor (table 250.66) is not ran with your feeders. It is ran from the service/system neutral to a grounding electrode (building steel, cold water, ufer, ground rod,....)

    Equipment grounds (table 250.122) are the ground wire you pull with your feeders.

    You generally won't have either with your service conductors from the utility.

    Exceptions may apply when dealing with bonding jumpers.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    3 Hr 2 Min from Winged Horses
    Posts
    15,966
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by augie47 View Post
    A somewhat simple rule I tell guys to follow is to ask yourself if there is an overcurrent device directly protecting the associated phase wires. If the wires are protected by a fuse or breaker, then 250.122 is used based on that fuse/breaker size. If there is no overcurrent protection, such as the secondary of a transformer or service wires from a meter socket, then 250.66 is your guide.

    Not 100% fool-proof but pretty close.
    Gud enuf fer gubmint werk.

    (I think I strained a few brain cells typing that.)
    "Electricity is really just organized lightning." George Carlin


    Derek

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •