User Tag List

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 21 to 29 of 29

Thread: Flood waters & romex

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg, VA
    Posts
    6,042
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by mbrooke View Post
    How do we know water wont get into the jacket regardless? Nowhere is a perfect or snug fit guaranteed around the EGC and conductors.
    UF is rated for wet locations. I dont care if water gets in, it's buried all the time and sits for years in water/wet locations. If a house was wired with UF, it wouldn't need rewiring if/when flooded, which is what I was getting at.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    9,122
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    UF is rated for wet locations. I dont care if water gets in, it's buried all the time and sits for years in water/wet locations. If a house was wired with UF, it wouldn't need rewiring if/when flooded, which is what I was getting at.
    Oh- my mistake. I thought you meant Canadian NM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg, VA
    Posts
    6,042
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by James L View Post
    That's a great way to put it. But he asked.....


    You know the difference between a sadist and a masochist?
    A masochist says "beat me" and a sadist says "no"


    Yeah, those Tyco splices *are* an option, and I've used them before where a cable needed to be extended behind something basically un-fishable, like wainscoating. I'd not use them house wide under any circumstance.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Kansas Cty, Mo, USA
    Posts
    478
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post


    Yeah, those Tyco splices *are* an option, and I've used them before where a cable needed to be extended behind something basically un-fishable, like wainscoating. I'd not use them house wide under any circumstance.
    Can you imagine spending $600 on those kits and then spending a whole week making them up?

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Williamsburg, VA
    Posts
    6,042
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by James L View Post
    Can you imagine spending $600 on those kits and then spending a whole week making them up?
    I imagine after a while you'd get pretty good at it. and mobile homes use devices that are similar in design. but no, I'd not want to use them for anything more than a single, emergency fix where cutting open the wall isnt possible w/o major damage to it or its finish.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, WI, US
    Posts
    34
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There are splice kits which are UL listed for Non-accessible applications:

    3-wire
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Tyco-Elec...69-2/202204327

    2-wire
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Tyco-Elec...-000/202204326


    So these are really made to be concealed in the wall??
    So if the connection goes bad.....

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Kansas Cty, Mo, USA
    Posts
    478
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    I imagine after a while you'd get pretty good at it. and mobile homes use devices that are similar in design. but no, I'd not want to use them for anything more than a single, emergency fix where cutting open the wall isnt possible w/o major damage to it or its finish.
    I've used one in my whole life, in a finished basement with no unfinished area except furnace room. Home run dropped down from main floor to switches which were being deleted. No can light close enough, etc. So I spliced that one home run

    I felt ashamed of myself....

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    29
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for all the input. Though the reason for paper wrapping is a bit off topic, still interesting.
    @ JamesL - now we're getting somewhere. The splices - I assume satisfy code - buried in a drywall, 2x4 cavity?
    From the Home Dep pic, they don't look any safer than putting a box (e.g., metal, w/ romex clamps) and a lid inside the wall. Maybe it has to do w/ size of a buried box - bigger target if cutting into a wall? Not sure. Other than the splices' clamping force, they don't look "safer" than a quality J-box & lid.

    What about any of these (I just filtered on 600v) https://www.grainger.com/category/sp...1splice%2Bkits

    For instance, https://www.grainger.com/product/IDE...ce-Kits-29UJ82 says it's for UNDERground, 600v. Where / how would I find out if any splice met / exceeded code for indoor & inside a wall?

    Re: actual water height. The day the water receded, I determined from some 16" concrete blocks on end (raising furniture), the water level in the house had to be < 8". More like 7" or 6."
    Took a day to sink in. So it never got to std height outlets & not to the load center. There are 3 or 4 outlets - maybe a few more - closer to the slab. They probably were under a couple inches water ~ 24 - 36 hrs, est.
    The drywall is all removed to ~ 42" now, but I didn't check how wire ran to those few low outlets. Straight up, or sideways. But I can.
    Eventually, flood insurance / FEMA requires removing 48" of drywall - apparently if there's only 1" of water.

    Re: checking water wicking (if any) in the few low outlets. (this is more like a 1-7/8 story) Other than replacing the wire to near the 1st floor ceiling (at least 9ft, maybe more in one room) & checking that the wrapping isn't wet at that point, the testing method - if & how high - water wicked up is a bit puzzling. There are "moisture meters" - made to check lumber, slabs, walls, etc. Some have 2 very small probes. I suppose you could gently pierce the sheathing - several ft above the outlet - over the grd conductor & test w/ a meter. Granted, it's only a few outlets.

    Don't know if code allows cutting / slicing / penetrating romex sheathing (for any reason), then re-seal, say a short slice in outer sheathing w/ tape, liquid tape or any other product. I don't see that as a risk, despite code. They MAKE many splice products for below & above ground cables, but don't know exact applications. Maybe mfg's sites give applications.

    Fishing new wire to the 2nd story attic & setting a J box - "just to be safe," is a fair amt of work, w/o knowing if water wicked 1 inch or past the 1st floor ceiling. But, can be done..
    In ONE room, the near to floor outlets are on an outside wall, that does NOT have a 2nd story above it - only a low pitch roof w/ too small an attic space to get near the top plate of the outer wall.
    It'd take luck & skill to run a fish tape from the breakfast room, into the tight attic (maybe 4:12 pitch roof there) & get it to move back toward open attic. It's theoretically "possible."

    I haven't actually crawled into that part of attic. Maybe w/ a long pole / extension pole of sorts, to reach ? 12 - 15 ft (wild guess) across the low attic, that could grab the fish tape or, bend the tape down enough, so it started running along the roof decking, toward the taller attic. It could be difficult on certain outlets.

    @ Goldstar:
    Wiring under water If undamaged, no replacement is necessary
    So... NJ decided that water wicking up the grd conductor wrapping wasn't an issue? Or did I misinterpret?
    IIRC, with Sandy, some parts of NJ had salt or brackish flood water? Here, no salt. Rising water was from rain & dam releases. Yes - it could have caused sanitary sewers to overflow. Don't think that's a danger to copper.
    Unless you got a water sample from the house, or take a wire section to a testing lab, no way to know what was in water. If anything of concern, I'd wager it was pretty diluted, as the rains were torrential & record breaking.
    IMHO, if I couldn't readily and easily identify whether any cabling was damaged I would replace it.
    How would you determine if water wicked up the romex? Or just ignore that, as NJ did? For wire, other than water in the ground wrapping, what would damage it, if walls are all standing?
    we're not talking about a few inches of water - we're talking about feet of water
    Not here, we're not. About 8" -almost certainly less. Who ever said that some NJ houses had water wick 10 ft up the romex, IIRC didn't say how high the water was above the lowest cut end of romex. 7 in. vs. 7 ft of water makes a huge difference how high the water inside romex had to overcome gravity Also length of time it was under water.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Kansas Cty, Mo, USA
    Posts
    478
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by LarrywdH View Post
    There are splice kits which are UL listed for Non-accessible applications:

    3-wire
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Tyco-Elec...69-2/202204327

    2-wire
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/Tyco-Elec...-000/202204326


    So these are really made to be concealed in the wall??
    So if the connection goes bad.....
    Yes, designed to be concealed & non-accessible.

    They have screw terminals to connect the wires, and a janky strain relief strap. And they clip together like a quick-connect.

    If the connection goes bad, you're probably thinking a flying splice with wire nuts would have been better.

    I've used one in my entire life, and I didn't like it.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •