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Thread: Paddle Fan Switch Location Rules?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by tw1156 View Post
    Texas does not require Vacancy/Occupancy sensors for Residential single dwelling.

    Edit: Depending on where you're located though, Texas has adopted the 2017 NEC.

    Under the 2017 NEC 422.31 (Disconnection of Permanently Connected Appliances):

    (A): Rated at Not over 300 VA or 1/8 HP: For permanently connected appliances rated at not over 300VA or 1/8HP, the branch circuit overcurrent device shall be permitted to serve as the disconnecting means where the switch or circuit breaker is within sight from the appliance or is lockable in accordance with 110.25.

    The bold section is new, and if you agree that a paddle-fan is an appliance, and you cannot see the switch as it's on the other side of the wall, you may have a leg to stand on.
    Doesn't the paddle fan have an integral on/off switch?
    Rob

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    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

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    Quote Originally Posted by hbiss View Post
    I believe the OP is referring to a Decora style switch that controls the exhaust fan.

    -Hal
    Makes sense. Still nothing prohibiting putting that switch in the garage if that is where you want it.

    Those type fans are typically under 300 VA or 1/8 Hp and don't require a disconnect within sight either.

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    Building Plans?

    Check the building plans (if any) to see if there is an electrical plan illustrating locations. If nothing else, this may give you a basis for an argument.

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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    Doesn't the paddle fan have an integral on/off switch?
    Even if it does, I do not believe an integral switch can serve as a disconnect the purpose of which is to de-energize the equipment in its entirety. A similar situation is a panelboard MCB doesn't de-energize a panelboard in its entirety for safe work on or within the panelboard.
    I will have achieved my life's goal if I die with a smile on my face.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smart $ View Post
    Even if it does, I do not believe an integral switch can serve as a disconnect the purpose of which is to de-energize the equipment in its entirety. A similar situation is a panelboard MCB doesn't de-energize a panelboard in its entirety for safe work on or within the panelboard.
    Typical "paddle fan" is below 1/8 hp/300 VA and doesn't require such switch to be on or within sight of the fan. The switch that is common on most of them is a pull chain switch and does not indicate if it is on or off either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smart $ View Post
    A similar situation is a panelboard MCB doesn't de-energize a panelboard in its entirety for safe work on or within the panelboard.
    But what does that have to do with the NEC general requirement for a disconnecting means?
    Rob

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    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    But what does that have to do with the NEC general requirement for a disconnecting means?
    Energized conductors are still within the equipment enclosure after the switch is flipped to the off position. Thus, the equipment is not disconnected completely. Work within the enclosure or to the enclosure itself could expose the worker to energized, possibly even uninsulated parts.

    ...same as an MCB with respect to an otherwise energized panelboard.
    I will have achieved my life's goal if I die with a smile on my face.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smart $ View Post
    Energized conductors are still within the equipment enclosure after the switch is flipped to the off position. Thus, the equipment is not disconnected completely. Work within the enclosure or to the enclosure itself could expose the worker to energized, possibly even uninsulated parts.

    ...same as an MCB with respect to an otherwise energized panelboard.
    If I go to change a blown fuse in a disconnect switch the conductors on the line side are still energized, where in the NEC does it say that an entire piece of equipment must be dead?
    Rob

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    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    If I go to change a blown fuse in a disconnect switch the conductors on the line side are still energized, where in the NEC does it say that an entire piece of equipment must be dead?
    I am with you on this - NEC is silent about that. Safety policy may or may not like the line side still energized if you are going to have the enclosure opened.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity View Post
    If I go to change a blown fuse in a disconnect switch the conductors on the line side are still energized, where in the NEC does it say that an entire piece of equipment must be dead?
    We're getting into maintenance issues which aren't really covered by the NEC, but you are talking about the disconnect itself, not the equipment it is disconnecting. The fuses are an integral part of the disconnect, not the equipment being affected by the disconnect. All the same, as long as you have the disconnect's cover open while it's line side is energized, you have to don the proper PPE for energized work.
    I will have achieved my life's goal if I die with a smile on my face.

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