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Thread: EGC installation requirement remote Sub-panel (NOT separate Building)

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    EGC installation requirement remote Sub-panel (NOT separate Building)

    Sorry if this question has been asked numerous times, but i cant find a thread dealing specifically with conduit installations. All installations I am referencing in this scenario are utilizing conduit runs. If a remote sub-panel is installed in a residence,(NOT a separate Building) where bonding is accomplished at the service panel (first point of disconnect). Is it a NEC code requirement that an equipment grounding conductor be run to the sub-panel or is the conduit a sufficient equipment grounding path. I know at the sub the neutral is isolated and the ground lug bonded. Is the conduit sufficient for clearing a fault.

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    EMT is allowed to be used as the equipment ground, article 358.60.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

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    It depends on the conduit, which you didn't say in all of that. As mentioned, EMT would be good to go.

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    Most metal raceways can act as equipment grounds.

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    Assuming you have a suitable metallic conduit, you'd also be smart to physically inspect the entire conduit run to verify it hasn't been broken or abused and is still continuous through all of its couplings, and that they are tight. I can't tell you how many I've repaired and can't figure out how it was installed so that things pulled apart. Do people just really not use wrenches anymore?

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    Thanks for the response!

    Quote Originally Posted by JFletcher View Post
    EMT is allowed to be used as the equipment ground, article 358.60.
    Thanks very much for your response and the NEC reference, I should have used the term EMT. I am a licensed electrician and for the past several years whether residential or commercial, we would run a separate equipment grounding conductor, as explained in my original post, to the sub to establish a solid bonding path, but i have also seen installations utilizing just the EMT and was discussing our reasoning (i.e., set screw couplings and connectors) with an inspector. Are buried RMC or IMC raceways to separate building sub-panels, also allowed as an equipment ground.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jot30 View Post
    Thanks very much for your response and the NEC reference, I should have used the term EMT. I am a licensed electrician and for the past several years whether residential or commercial, we would run a separate equipment grounding conductor, as explained in my original post, to the sub to establish a solid bonding path, but i have also seen installations utilizing just the EMT and was discussing our reasoning (i.e., set screw couplings and connectors) with an inspector. Are buried RMC or IMC raceways to separate building sub-panels, also allowed as an equipment ground.
    You are welcome. and yes, I did make the presumption that you knew that plastic raceways can not be used as a ground. IMC and RMC can also be used as the EGC. A separate wire EGC is often run though for a few reasons, though it has been proven numerous times a properly made up metallic conduit has a greater fault carrying capability than any copper wire that would fit inside of it.

    If an EMT raceway is installed underground, I believe it must be installed with weather-tite fittings and not set screw ones, even if it is not being used as the EGC.

    And I wholeheartedly agree with Mac702's post.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

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