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Thread: Gas Piping with Flexible Connector

  1. #1
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    Gas Piping with Flexible Connector

    Consider the following image:



    Others have called this out as improper... I would definitely agree with it isn't a "best practice," but I'm curious what electricians would say about the image.

    Assume a few things: 1) 2017 NEC 2) The gas piping meets a requirement to where it needs to be bonded to an equipment grounding conductor, and the conductor in the image is the appropriate size.

    I know of nothing specific that states that the connections of a gas appliance connector are not electrically continuous.

    Questions:

    1) Is the connection between the sediment trap and piping at the appliance considered electrically continuous with the house piping in the photo that it is connected to? Electrically is it treated any differently than any other metal to metal connection?

    2) Is this an improper bond/connection (excepting the fact of course that when the appliance is disconnected/replaced the connection would need to be moved etc

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    I don't see any harm but it's not necessary or required. The flex line does not have to be bonded like some CSST. The water heater itself will be bonded through the water lines if metallic. If not, it doesn't have to be bonded.

    -Hal

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    Quote Originally Posted by CuriousHomeInspector View Post

    Others have called this out as improper...
    Improper how?

    I would definitely agree with it isn't a "best practice," but I'm curious what electricians would say about the image.
    My best practice would be to not waste any time or extra materials to run that wire and clamp to that black iron gas pipe, 250.134 if memory serves, and there is zero reason to worry about the metal pan.
    If you don't think too good, don't think too much.

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    The equipment bonding is covered in 250.134. The bonding of the gas piping is covered in 250.104(B) and it requires no additional bonding other than a connection to the EGC installed with the branch circuit that supplies the equipment.

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    Bonding gas line

    Check to see if the yellow gas line can be used as a grounding. Some gas line are not rate as
    If not you should add the jumper between hot/cold to gas line.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ActionDave View Post
    My best practice would be to not waste any time or extra materials to run that wire and clamp to that black iron gas pipe, 250.134 if memory serves, and there is zero reason to worry about the metal pan.
    I agree. Black gas piping is bonded by the EGC in the circuit feeding the gas operated equipment no need to add a separate bonding jumper.
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp480volt View Post
    Check to see if the yellow gas line can be used as a grounding. Some gas line are not rate as
    If not you should add the jumper between hot/cold to gas line.
    That would be my thought. There is all that black pipe to connect to but you go to the end of a run, add a flex line, then bond to the small piece attached to that...

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