User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: alternative medical insurance to workers compensation

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    23,902
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by hbiss View Post
    What makes you think the insurance you have now won't cover you in that instance? ...
    -Hal
    Coverage for on the job injuries is exempted by many medical insurance plans.
    Don, Illinois
    (All code citations are 2017 unless otherwise noted)

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    270
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In Florida, the lawyers have a strong lobby. Might as well get the WC. Just say you're in Administrative duty 99 percent of the time. The Code is lower. Then, the other 1% percent you use as an electrician, which is higher. The auditor may have an issue with this ratio but it debatable.

    I found some old rates for 2013, but this is to show you the difference in how they charge you between risks. I guess the Architect may stab his finger with his pencil or maybe fall off his stool. The electrician can get electrocuted...

    Code 5190 - Electrical Wiring - Within Buildings $ 6.02 per hundred of payroll

    Code 8603 - Architectural Or Engineering Firm - Clerical $ .019 per hundred of payroll


  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Northern illinois
    Posts
    17,044
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by don_resqcapt19 View Post
    Coverage for on the job injuries is exempted by many medical insurance plans.
    That is not exactly true. What happens is that the workman's compensation Insurance becomes the primary insurance for work-related medical costs. It's just like if you have a a car accident. If you have medical coverage as part of your car insurance it can become the primary insurance for the first $25,000 or whatever you have.

    Usually if you have a healthcare claim on your health insurance company, related to a car accident, your health insurance company will pay out and then try to collect from the insurance company of the person that caused the accident.

    This of course varies from state-to-state and policy to policy so your mileage might vary.
    Bob

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
    Posts
    4,125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by don_resqcapt19 View Post
    Coverage for on the job injuries is exempted by many medical insurance plans.
    Right, because you are supposed to be covered by WC. Simple injuries you can get away with if you keep your mouth shut as I said above.

    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra
    Usually if you have a healthcare claim on your health insurance company, related to a car accident, your health insurance company will pay out and then try to collect from the insurance company of the person that caused the accident.
    And it's the same for a worker who gets hurt and doesn't have WC. He files a healthcare claim and the insurance company goes after the insurance of whoever the guy was working for. The term for this is subrogation.

    Bottom line is that what the OP proposes isn't going to work. Ask an insurance agent about what you need to do.

    -Hal

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    23,902
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    That is not exactly true. What happens is that the workman's compensation Insurance becomes the primary insurance for work-related medical costs. It's just like if you have a a car accident. If you have medical coverage as part of your car insurance it can become the primary insurance for the first $25,000 or whatever you have.
    ....
    Our policy does not appear to provide any benefits of any type if the injury was a workplace injury. From the policy.
    No payment will be made under this benefit plan for any loss sustained as a result of, or for charges incurred as a result of, any of the following: ...
    13) Accidental bodily injury, sickness or disease sustained while a person was performing any act of employment of doing anything pertaining to any occupation or employment for compensation, wages or profit, or for which benefits are or may be payable in whole or part under any Worker’s Compensation law or any Occupational Diseases law or similar law.
    Don, Illinois
    (All code citations are 2017 unless otherwise noted)

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
    Posts
    4,125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    ... for which benefits are or may be payable in whole or part under any Worker’s Compensation law or any Occupational Diseases law or similar law.
    So really, that means you are on your own if you don't have WC. It seems that they won't even go to bat for you. One thing everybody needs to keep in mind: insurance companies aren't in the business of paying out and will do whatever they can not to. They are in the business of taking money from you and keeping as much of it as possible.

    -Hal

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    3,794
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This is not specific to FL as I am not aware of their regulations. In NJ, if you are an LLC and you DON'T do commercial work or work for GC's you don''t have to carry WC insurance. You're on your own with that. You are considered an employee of your company even if you're the only one. However, once you start working at commercial properties or for GC's SOMEONE has to pay the WC insurance. So, if it's not you it has to be them nd chances are you won't get the work. In addition you will not be able to make a claim on your WC policy.

    That said, there is disability insurance available on the market. Consult your insurance agent and bring $$$. It's expensive !!!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    270
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you become a contractor, end the end, you will pay!


    I had guys fighting with hammers. Another one said he got a brain tumor because he cut his finger. Another one said he got ELECTROCUTED while changing a 60 watt incadescent light bulb. (Oh, he also called OSHA and I had to fight that one since they marked me up as no lock out tag out., which was a 10,000 fine. There's more but why bore you.

    And of course, you get the guy hired, and he hurts his back the first day. Then you find out this is his third time. He's already pulled that crap and got paid from other contractors.

    And most of the time, if you say you want to fight it, the insurance company wants to settle. So, your exposer rate increases and there goes being competitive on bid day!

    Gosh, I love this trade!

    And my dad said to me one time, "so you want to be an electrical contractor" ?

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •