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Thread: What good is a german journeyman certificate?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christoph View Post
    already had my fare share of grief..
    Quote Originally Posted by Sahib View Post
    ..So why not become a PE?
    Quote Originally Posted by Christoph View Post
    That's not what I'm trying to do..
    Once you realize grief follows bad business, no matter how its organized, you see Sahib just suggested one way out.

    It's not too late for you. Half your life is not lost yet, getting kicked around between jobs.

    Estimators are kicked to the curb when shops slow down. Even if Masters get too busy to estimate themselves, they are unlikely to hire anything but a teacher of new tricks for a while, much less hire some entry level help that cost more time holding their hand.

    Engineers working for larger firms, or an Architect, can have some diversity in the industries they serve, a broader geographic reach with global clients, and potentially more consistent, and stable work.

    Power Engineers (PE) serving international clients only need be familiar with that Inter/National Code affecting the highly specialized section of their plans, giving as much scope as possible to Contractors and their AHJ's.

    Mastering the entire NEC can't be done in one lifetime, but avoiding it can.
    Roger Ramjet NoFixNoPay

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by myspark View Post
    Do you mean they are not doing their electrical work safely enough as we do here?

    They may use a lot of plastic but I haven't seen Germans dying because they didn't use NEC or metal conduits..
    I don't know their overcurrent protection rules or the details of applying "RCD" protection, but they have taken into consideration the products they are using and not the products that are common in North America when selecting their rules, and you can say the same or us in North America. Their conductors are not sized by AWG but rather square mm, insulation may have some different characteristics - overcurrent protection is more about keeping the insulation from being compromised than it is about actual size of the conductor.

    They have "ring circuits" which are prohibited by NEC. They also have fuses at the outlet in many cases where we typically don't for general use receptacle outlets. A lot of things are designed to different standards, so therefore you may expect to see different rules on otherwise similar aspects of the installation.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post

    They have "ring circuits" which are prohibited by NEC. They also have fuses at the outlet in many cases where we typically don't for general use receptacle outlets. A lot of things are designed to different standards, so therefore you may expect to see different rules on otherwise similar aspects of the installation.
    Ring circuits are not European EU wiring standards They are a British folly that are used in countries with deep British influence like Malaysia, Singapoe and a few others

    Germans and Eastern Europeans use the radial style wiring like North America.

  4. #34
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    German journeyman certificate

    Quote Originally Posted by Christoph View Post
    Hello everyone,

    first of all thank you very much for welcoming me to the forum.

    A little background first of all to set the scene:

    I was born and raised in germany. I did a full 3.5 year apprenticeship in germany from 2006 to 2010. In 2015 I came to the US and worked here, first on the Philadelphia Shipyard in the new construction of oil tankers and then for a german company installing and relocating industrial machinery.

    After some other odds and ends electrical jobs I just got offered a Project Manager / Estimator Job that I couldnt say no to so here I sit in my own office plus truck etc.

    The original question is, with a german journeyman certificate, does anyone know of anything I can do with it as far as certifications in the US go? I know about all the waiting periods and such to apply for licenses and sit for tests.

    On one hand I understand the differences in the NEC vs. the VDE in germany and the shortcomings I have regarding the NEC but on the other hand it doesnt seem right to me to do yet another 4 year apprenticeship, especially considering my position in the company.

    I am in PA, Reading or Philadelphia (cities havent been any helpful with information, I guess they dont know what to do with it, please dont get me started with the Union, I already had my fare share of giref with them).

    I am thankful for any input. Maybe an outline on how to obtain a master license the quickest way.

    Thank you very much
    Dukes of hazard pa pig farmers that control the state have been dragging there hoofed feet since 1964 on State electric license. I worked at the old Whitman's Chocolate Plant in Philly during the 1980's. We had a German 10 million dollar state of the art Otto Hansel pick and place machine. I had the pleasure to work with a German Electrician and 4 German mechanics for the 10 weeks it took to erect and wire in the machine. I was amassed how smart and hard working the men were. I remember questing the electrician on his electrical training, He stated that after graduation high school he went to school full time for 2 years and had to pass a 40 hour test to graduate .In Philadelphia to secure a electric license you need 4 years of experience OSHA 10 training along proof of business and car insurance. 2 years of school equal 1 year of experience. I belong to the Philadelphia chapter of the IAEI [ International Association of Electrical Inspectors ]. They have 8 yearly meetings where the head of the Philadelphia License & Inspection electrical unit attends every meeting along with at least 15 electrical inspectors,a few engineers and over 75 electricians. Maybe you can attend one of these meetings and ask questions. Some suburbs of Philly do not recognize a Philly license and make you take a test [ at least the did 10 years ago]. Good luck Tom Garbo Also go onto Phil.gov site for help.

  5. #35
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    Maybe the question/answer already been stated but what did your job say regarding skipping the appreciate time, how did your company react?
    Last edited by Dennis Alwon; 02-09-19 at 06:56 PM.

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