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Thread: Electrical shock 277 v

  1. #11
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    1) Go to the doctor don't worry about anyone, they aren't worried about you.
    2) Report this to your employer, you can have your Forman with you or not, that way he can try to cover his behind for being an idiot.
    3) OSHA no hot work.
    4) Get your companies ,lock out tag out, policie in writing (in case you get laid off/ fired). Find out if they have a tag box, lock hasp, breaker locks.

    It sounds like I'm being an ahole but you only live once; in the old days your "Forman" would have got a set of Kliens wrapped around his head.

  2. #12
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    Even if you opt to not make a big stir, at least find out if your employer has workers comp so you can see a doctor. That’s what they pay into for such things, even if it raises his contribution a little.
    Was your face near a suspended ceiling grid, and how would your toe feel a shock was there something grounded to your ladder?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mopowr steve View Post
    Even if you opt to not make a big stir, at least find out if your employer has workers comp so you can see a doctor. That’s what they pay into for such things, even if it raises his contribution a little.
    Was your face near a suspended ceiling grid, and how would your toe feel a shock was there something grounded to your ladder?
    Agree. Knowing the current path may be important if you seek medical treatment (which I strongly recommend). Having two hands on the same hot wire will not get you shocked; that's just like the bird on a wire. There must have been a path back to the source. Was it a metal or fiberglass ladder? If it was fiberglass, then it almost had to have been through some other path. I agree that the head touching the ceiling is a common path. Another possibility is that it was a hand-to-hand contact where you came in series with the load. If one hand was on the feed wire and the other on the load, you would get shocked, especially if the load were a magnetic ballast.

    Please take care of yourself first.

    Mark

  4. #14
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    Yes sir. I was untwisting the two wires (hot) the one from the fixture and the power dropping in . We had installed the fixture the night before but it was the wrong one so I was taking it down and had removed the wire nut and was untwisting those two wires with my thumb and index finger (stranded snd solid) when he turned the breaker on. This was an exterior light so there was no ceiling tiles . I was on a fiberglass ladder

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jlcolombiana777 View Post
    Yes sir. I was untwisting the two wires (hot) the one from the fixture and the power dropping in . We had installed the fixture the night before but it was the wrong one so I was taking it down and had removed the wire nut and was untwisting those two wires with my thumb and index finger (stranded snd solid) when he turned the breaker on
    You are a lucky girl to have survived the electrocution.
    He would be lucky to survive his job.

    Here, UK, it would be instant dismissal for what he did and for what he didn't.
    No written permit to work on the project?
    No method statement?
    No LOTO procedure?

    Mods, feel free to delete my comments.

    .

  6. #16
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    Bes and I have had our differences of opinion in the past but, as a former member of the NFPA 70E TC, I'm giving him a double thumbs up on every comment/post he's made so far.
    "Bob"
    Robert B. Alexander, P.E.
    Answers based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Besoeker3 View Post
    I'm a foreigner but I'll give my two pence worth anyway.

    First of all, I'm sorry the OP got electrocuted. Thankfully, she survived what could have a fatal accident. And I agree with others here - she must seek medical advice for the ongoing symptoms.

    I think that any accident or near miss must be reported and investigated. If for no other reason than to prevent a recurrence with possibly a worse outcome.

    That an apprentice got to be working on what turned out to be live circuits is not a trivial matter. It should not be dismissed nor swept under the carpet.

    Rant over.

    Electrocute means to kill with electricity. OP would be dead if electrocuted. Shocked is more fitting by definition.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jlcolombiana777 View Post
    Yes I apologize about the grammatical errors. I reposted but they put it as a duplicate. I did indeed have both hands on the hot because I was untwisting the wires to take down the fixture , in that sense I'm kind of blessed because normally I have one hand leaning against the metal part of the fixture which I suppose would have caused me to get hurt worse. I felt two jolts go up my right arm and I was on the ladder but it seems the point of exit was through my left thumb and left foot. I did not see any Burns but it felt as if I was burning inside my face on the left side which became very red my ear was red and hot to the touch. It felt as if I was burning inside underneath my skin which was strange to me I've never experienced anything like that. The breaker was off when I began working on it the situation was that the foreman flipped the breaker on while myself and my coworker we're still in the middle of taking the fixtures down. Fortunately he did not get hit. I appreciate all of your input and especially about the time frame for reporting an accident. There were many witnesses and what not including my foreman so I guess what it comes down to is not about getting anybody in trouble but taking care of my health And being sure this doesn't happen to anybody else. As an apprentice I'm kind of timid when it comes to a situation like this because I really need my job and I'm hesitant to speak up because I don't want this to affect my career.
    Honestly, you should have gone to the hospital. There have been cases of people dropping dead several days after an electric shock. I've never fully understood why as they never went into much detail when I read up upon it but from the grape vine supposedly cardiac arrhythmias which deteriorate. Second internal burns can cause dead tissue to seap toxins into the blood over whelming organs.

    You are probably fine now, but if it happens again call 911 or check yourself into an ER. Vitals can tell a lot.
    I'm in over my head...

  8. #18
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    By definition electrocuted includes injury. I was surprised, too. Our trade tends to think it means death.
    Tom
    TBLO

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ptonsparky View Post
    By definition electrocuted includes injury. I was surprised, too. Our trade tends to think it means death.
    It depends on the definition- dictionaries that take common use (or misuse) of words give it multiple definitions.
    I'm in over my head...

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbrooke View Post


    Honestly, you should have gone to the hospital. There have been cases of people dropping dead several days after an electric shock. I've never fully understood why as they never went into much detail when I read up upon it but from the grape vine supposedly cardiac arrhythmias which deteriorate. Second internal burns can cause dead tissue to seap toxins into the blood over whelming organs.

    You are probably fine now, but if it happens again call 911 or check yourself into an ER. Vitals can tell a lot.
    Internal injury may not be noticeable at first. Going to hospital and having vitals monitored can tell them if a critical internal organ isn't doing what it is supposed to be doing before it becomes a sudden emergency later on. Not a medical expert, but have heard of them discovering internal problems just with abnormal O2 levels, kinds of things that after some time has passed can make you suddenly drop dead with little or no warning.

    General rule is to go to emergency room after any severe shock incident, even if you think you feel fine.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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