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Thread: Class 2 Wiring....

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    Just because it is 0-10 volt doesn't automatically mean this control loop is a class 2 circuit.
    I thought if it was listed equipment it pretty much did. And luminaires have to be listed.

    Take a look at 725.121(A)(3) exception #2
    Bob

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by petersonra View Post
    I thought if it was listed equipment it pretty much did. And luminaires have to be listed.

    Take a look at 725.121(A)(3) exception #2
    I have seen the dimming drivers with the dimming circuit marked as suitable for both Class 1 and Class 2 wiring.
    Don, Illinois
    (All code citations are 2017 unless otherwise noted)

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    Quote Originally Posted by don_resqcapt19 View Post
    I have seen the dimming drivers with the dimming circuit marked as suitable for both Class 1 and Class 2 wiring.

    I looked at the fixture driver cuts and they are marked class 2.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mstrlucky74 View Post
    I looked at the fixture driver cuts and they are marked class 2.
    Which means you can use class 2 wiring methods and other class 2 items on the circuit.

    You also are allowed to reclassify it as class 1 and run the wires in same conduit as your power wiring, but that also means the entire control circuit gets reclassified as class 1. You can not mix and match things to suit your wants/needs once you do this.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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    I see nowhere in Section 725 that class 2 and 120v can’t be in the same box. Issue is I have 120v(in conduit) and class 2 dimming going to the same ballast/driver in a fixture. I’m bring the class 2 “free air” and the 120v

    Scenario #1 – Have power conduit going directly into downlight box. Guess one could just bring in the 0-10v class 2 into a different ko on the box as it’s attached to the downlight.

    Scenario #2- Tricky one. Would one need separate whips to separate j-boxes for the 0-10v class 2.?

    Thanks.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mstrlucky74 View Post
    I see nowhere in Section 725 that class 2 and 120v can’t be in the same box. Issue is I have 120v(in conduit) and class 2 dimming going to the same ballast/driver in a fixture. I’m bring the class 2 “free air” and the 120v

    Scenario #1 – Have power conduit going directly into downlight box. Guess one could just bring in the 0-10v class 2 into a different ko on the box as it’s attached to the downlight.

    Scenario #2- Tricky one. Would one need separate whips to separate j-boxes for the 0-10v class 2.?

    Thanks.
    If 0-10V is indeed class 2 they must be in separate wiring methods or a listed assembly that effectively separates the two circuits per the listing.

    If it is class 2 circuit that has been "reclassified" then it is no longer a class 2 circuit. But that means the entire circuit becomes class 1, you can't throw in class 2 cabling or devices wherever you decide is convenient.

    More common example over the years of this is HVAC thermostat wiring. If you decided to reclassify the control circuit as class 1 circuit to be able to run thermostat wiring with the supply power wiring - you can't run typical 18 ga thermostat cable in the raceway, it would have to be 300 or 600 volt conductors. You also can not connect it to typical 24 volt class 2 rated wall thermostat - it would have to be a thermostat rated for line voltage since it is not a class 2 circuit even though it is still 24 volts.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  7. #17
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    So spoke to engineer yesterday and he said you can combine class 2 with 120v power wiring if the class 2 insulation id rated for 600v. I've heard of this before but thought there was a caveat. Maybe it's the reclassifying if you do this???

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    Quote Originally Posted by mstrlucky74 View Post
    So spoke to engineer yesterday and he said you can combine class 2 with 120v power wiring if the class 2 insulation id rated for 600v. I've heard of this before but thought there was a caveat. Maybe it's the reclassifying if you do this???
    You must use insulation rated for highest voltage present in the cable/raceway. Normally you are using 600 volt rated conductors, with 120 volt power circuit being present you only would be required to have 120 volt insulation - though something rated either 300 or 600 volts will be much more common to come up with.

    You also still must "reclassify" the entire class 2 circuit. That means you can't just run 600 volt conductor where you wish to run with power conductors, you must also land in devices rated for class 1/power applications.

    See 725.130 exception 2 and informational note that follows.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    You must use insulation rated for highest voltage present in the cable/raceway. Normally you are using 600 volt rated conductors, with 120 volt power circuit being present you only would be required to have 120 volt insulation - though something rated either 300 or 600 volts will be much more common to come up with.

    You also still must "reclassify" the entire class 2 circuit. That means you can't just run 600 volt conductor where you wish to run with power conductors, you must also land in devices rated for class 1/power applications.

    See 725.130 exception 2 and informational note that follows.
    Thanks, I thought so.

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