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Thread: Residential garage

  1. #1
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    Residential garage

    The basement/ garage area of a common “A” frame home in my area has a steel beam running thru the center of the home at a 90 degree angle to floor joists. In the basement laundry part bored holes are common rules pretty straight forward.

    But the typical garage has a finished ceiling and the nm cables are attached/ bundled between finished ceiling and steel beam exposed. Is this code compliant?

    After the steel beam ends wires are bundled run along wall finished ceiling height to service panel drop about a foot then enter panel is this OK

    334.15C gives some good info as does 300.4 but I’m having trouble. With the garages here having finished ceilings and the above methods seeming so common and probably incorrect is what causes me confusion

    Thanks for your help

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    Quote Originally Posted by dm9289 View Post
    The basement/ garage area of a common “A” frame home in my area has a steel beam running thru the center of the home at a 90 degree angle to floor joists. In the basement laundry part bored holes are common rules pretty straight forward.

    But the typical garage has a finished ceiling and the nm cables are attached/ bundled between finished ceiling and steel beam exposed. Is this code compliant?

    After the steel beam ends wires are bundled run along wall finished ceiling height to service panel drop about a foot then enter panel is this OK

    334.15C gives some good info as does 300.4 but I’m having trouble. With the garages here having finished ceilings and the above methods seeming so common and probably incorrect is what causes me confusion

    Thanks for your help
    I am having a hard time understanding what you are describing in bold print above.

    Steel beam is presumably there to support ceiling framing members as they probably aren't rated to span wall to wall, how is it you have a space between it and the ceiling to bundle the cables?
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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    The word "bundled" raises eyebrows...watch 310.15(B)(3) !
    At my age, I'm accustomed to restaurants asking me to pay in advance, but now my bank has started sending me their calendar one month at a time.

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    Typically in this area a wooden beam is on top of steel beam and it is attached between steel wood and ceiling

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    Quote Originally Posted by dm9289 View Post
    Typically in this area a wooden beam is on top of steel beam and it is attached between steel wood and ceiling
    So you essentially have a wood beam below and supporting the joists, and an additional steel beam below and supporting it? Don't see what is gained by that but not really relevant to your question either. I take it cables in question are attached to this wood beam? If AHJ considers them protected from physical damage then it is probably fine to run them there. Whether or not they are considered bundled or not may require you apply ampacity adjustments.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 248
Size:  161.2 KB

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    Quote Originally Posted by dm9289 View Post
    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 248
Size:  161.2 KB
    Your "wood beam" is more of a continuous "shim" than it is a beam. It alone is not adding strength to the beam. But is now clear what you were describing. In that image I'd say that cable is not exposed after finish is put on those vertical strips. Could possibly need protection nail plates if not over 1-1/4 inch from face of strip to the cable though.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by augie47 View Post
    The word "bundled" raises eyebrows...watch 310.15(B)(3) !

    Yes if you look at the beam picture I posted it would be similar to that with a drywall ceiling. Lets say 8 NM cables typically tie wrapped to create the bundle. I am not sure how to derate no conduit

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    The picture I posted is an example of the beam but the finished garage ceiling is what is different. Typically you will see 8 NM cables tie wrapped across the beam then 90 degree angle attached in corner of ceiling and block wall then a 90 downward to panel. Hope this clears my description up.

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    I honestly don't see how NM ever survives at all.

    You would think the wiring methods designed for a dwelling type installation would be more robust.

    Oh well,,,,


    JAP>

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