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Thread: 250.64(C) GEC irreversible splices - why?

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    250.64(C) GEC irreversible splices - why?

    Code:
    250.64(C) "GEC's shall be installed in one continuous length without a splice or joint except as permitted in (1) and (2)
      (1) Splicing shall be permitted only by irreversible compression-type  connectors listed as grounding and bonding equipment or by the  exothermic welding process.
    What's the reasoning behind the irreversible connectors requirement for the GEC? Is it to prevent tempering or to ensure proper surge current passage? Would a split bolt, acorn, or screw lug style connector work the same from a physics perspective? thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by EBQ View Post
    Code:
    250.64(C) "GEC's shall be installed in one continuous length without a splice or joint except as permitted in (1) and (2)
      (1) Splicing shall be permitted only by irreversible compression-type  connectors listed as grounding and bonding equipment or by the  exothermic welding process.
    What's the reasoning behind the irreversible connectors requirement for the GEC? Is it to prevent tempering or to ensure proper surge current passage? Would a split bolt, acorn, or screw lug style connector work the same from a physics perspective? thanks
    Any connector properly installed will perform it's purpose from a physics perspective however, an irreversible connection is supposed to be just that which is permanent.

    Roger
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    Quote Originally Posted by EBQ View Post
    Code:
    250.64(C) "GEC's shall be installed in one continuous length without a splice or joint except as permitted in (1) and (2)
      (1) Splicing shall be permitted only by irreversible compression-type  connectors listed as grounding and bonding equipment or by the  exothermic welding process.
    What's the reasoning behind the irreversible connectors requirement for the GEC? Is it to prevent tempering or to ensure proper surge current passage? Would a split bolt, acorn, or screw lug style connector work the same from a physics perspective? thanks
    There is no reason. It's just one part of the continued over emphasis in the importance of grounding
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

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    Quote Originally Posted by electrofelon View Post
    There is no reason. It's just one part of the continued over emphasis in the importance of grounding
    Which may not be as important as some want to think it is. Bonding is definitely important though.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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    Because for some unknown reason CMP 5 seems to think that a GEC is more important than an EGC. It is my opinion that the EGC is far more important than the GEC.
    Don, Illinois
    (All code citations are 2017 unless otherwise noted)

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    Quote Originally Posted by don_resqcapt19 View Post
    Because for some unknown reason CMP 5 seems to think that a GEC is more important than an EGC. It is my opinion that the EGC is far more important than the GEC.
    I agree, the system would work just fine with no electrodes or GEC's as long as the main bonding jumper was in place.
    Rob

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    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

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    Does the GES even do anything meaningful locally for surge currents? when service neutral already provides a lower resistance path to absorb excess voltage and is bonded to earth at the transformer.

    Other than bonding earth to metal to equalize potentials, what else does a GES accomplish?

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    Quote Originally Posted by EBQ View Post
    Does the GES even do anything meaningful locally for surge currents? when service neutral already provides a lower resistance path to absorb excess voltage and is bonded to earth at the transformer.

    Other than bonding earth to metal to equalize potentials, what else does a GES accomplish?
    It just adds one more electrode to a large network of electrodes.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwired View Post
    It just adds one more electrode to a large network of electrodes.
    So it's really insurance for the whole, rather than the individual, at least as it relates to a surge.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EBQ View Post
    So it's really insurance for the whole, rather than the individual, at least as it relates to a surge.
    mostly yes.

    Now inspectors seem to be trained to think a missing GEC is the worst possible thing that can happen, and occupants of a building without one are certain to die because of it, reality is it is not.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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