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Thread: Where do we use 1.73 when calculating 3 phase power

  1. #21
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    Aug 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by junkhound View Post
    Well, For a perfectly balanced system, they are the SAME BY DEFINITION of tangent. My comment was for a non-balanced system.
    Gotcha--- Shift a phase a degree or two and then the difference shows up--Missed that in your post
    RichB N7NEC

  2. #22
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    horse power

    Quote Originally Posted by Carultch View Post
    That's not even remotely close to what the unit horsepower means at all. It makes no mention of how high the horse lifts the load, and 746 is really the number for the conversion factor of HP to Watts.

    What happened is, James Watt needed a performance metric to sell the steam engine, and compare it to something people already understood. He studied the performance of draft horses, and how much load they could lift by pulling a mill wheel. Based on the speed the horses walked, and the load the millwheel lifted, he determined that horses could pull with the power equivalent to lifting a 550 pound vertical load at a rate of 1 ft per second.
    1 horse power can lift 198000 lbs 1 foot in one hour . what is your problem .

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by domnic View Post
    1 horse power can lift 198000 lbs 1 foot in one hour . what is your problem .
    Your original post didn't mention how high the horse could lift that weight.

  4. #24
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    746 watts

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulMmn View Post
    Your original post didn't mention how high the horse could lift that weight.
    WITH the info given you can find the how high the lift is with a little math.

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