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Thread: elctric heat in airport hanger

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
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    Royal City, WA
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    Across the highway from my shop is a runway for an Ag spray plane service. Jock has infloor hydronic heat. It works great. He sets the heat at 65 degrees. This is probably a 10,000 sf hangar.

    If something comes inside that’s wet, it and the floor are dry in an hour or two. If your doing mechanical work on the floor it’s comfortable. Every winter he hosts a hanger dance. Nobody has to wear a coat inside the hangar. Outside, that’s a different story.

    as previously mentioned, the other option is radiant heaters. They heat objects, not the air.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Clark County, NV
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    Quote Originally Posted by mortimer View Post
    Is this possible? If so , how would you approach it?
    I can do it. Who's paying?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Seattle, WA
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulMmn View Post
    Most 'open-air' kinds of places (like auto repair garages) use infra-red heaters mounted near the ceiling, aiming at the area below. Some are electric, some are gas. But they don't try to heat the air, they try to heat the objects (ie people) below.
    They're called "radiant heaters." It works the same way the Sun does: it has little direct effect on the temperature of the air, but it makes you feel warm. The air temperature is impacted more by reflected heat from the ground than by sunlight passing through the air. Just think of the difference between standing in the direct sunlight and stepping one foot away and finding yourself in shade. The air temperature is the same in both locations, but the way you feel is vastly different.

    We are working on several projects that use this heating system, including a vehicle maintenance facility. There is a concern over combustible materials being too close to the heater. But each heater has a zone of influence within which there is a potential flammability hazard, and outside of which there is not. So there is a design task involved in selecting and placing the heaters.

    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

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