User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 12 of 12

Thread: Lazy River Pool Pump Vault 680.12 & 680.13

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    NE Nebraska
    Posts
    41,635
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by tom baker View Post
    Example of clean water, related to this post
    A small vault, about 3 ft sq x 2 ft deep, with a 2 hp pump,a water booster pump, filled with rainwater as roots clogged the drain.
    The fuses blew. This was on a weekend, customers out of water
    Choice was to pull the motor and have it baked in an oven by a motor shop , or replace fuses, start pump and let it dry itself out, nothing to loose.
    Turned on and ran, dried out OK.
    If dirty water, IE flood or sewage the motor would be replaced (not worth working on for a 2 hp) due to contamination.

    At a Mike Holt Seminar, some one commented "water and electricity don't mix". Mikes comment was clean water is not a conductor. He takes a plug strip, puts in a water picture and proceeds to drink from it
    Tap water typically has minerals in it and is conductive. We have to presume plug strip was energized, but standing on a carpeted floor greatly lessens any risk. Might not want to try this on wet concrete on grade, worse yet while barefoot.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Greenville SC
    Posts
    791
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes, "pure" water is non-conductive. My first job out of engineering school was in a Duke Power (now Duke Energy) generating station. Generator stator (output) coils were hollow and water cooled. Units I worked with were at least 40MW up to 1.2GW. Generator voltage tended to be in the 18kV to 35kV range. Larger units (I don't remember any specifics) didn't have generator breakers or switches as the current was to high for then-current technology. They stepped it up to 100kV, 230kV, or 500kV and switched it there. We used ACB, OCB VCB, and SF6 breakers/switches.

    Generator rotors (field coils and core losses) were hydrogen cooled with hydrogen between 0.5 psig (1920's vintage) to 60 psig (1970s vintage) with oil fed labyrinth shaft seals to keep the hydrogen in. Every seal had multiple sensors to confirm the H2 concentration was WELL away from combustible ranges.

    Hard to believe it's been 45 years.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •