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Thread: What is the ampacity for 8 AWG wire? 50 or 40

  1. #11
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    Thank you all
    I also talked to several electricians with 30 years experience
    They told me that 8 AWG is OK

    Gil Amor
    Amor Electric

  2. #12
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    Talking oh ?

    Quote Originally Posted by gilamor
    Thank you all
    I also talked to several electricians with 30 years experience
    They told me that 8 AWG is OK

    Gil Amor
    Amor Electric
    that conviences me..

    lets throw out the code books and set up a panel of electricians with 30 yrs experience.

    Gil, not knocking experience...about 50 years of it here...but (a) codes change (b) a lot of answers are based on lack of input, and (c) trust me, sometimes exprience can mean you've just been doing it wrong a long time.

    I think you can see from the answers here...there are many varibles that make the determination of wire size and allowed ampacities.

  3. #13
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    I agree with Augie experience has nothing to do with it.

    1 year or 50 years in you should own a current code book and know how to look the answer up.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by gilamor
    I guess I don’t understand why the rating of a terminal would have any effect on the ampacity of the wire?
    Look at it like this: Its more the other way around. The ampacity of the wire is not what changes, it's the terminal's ability to withstand the heat contributed by the conductor when used at the various amperage levels.

    Obvioulsy, a #8 loaded at 50a will generate more heat than will the same conductor when loaded at 40a. The equipment may or may not be able to survive when subject to the extra heat from the more-heavily-loaded conductor.
    Code references based on 2005 NEC
    Larry B. Fine
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by augie47
    Gil, not knocking experience...about 50 years of it here...but (a) codes change (b) a lot of answers are based on lack of input, and (c) trust me, sometimes exprience can mean you've just been doing it wrong a long time.
    Something I had heard once. 30 years of experience = 1 year of experience followed by 29 years of repeating the same thing over again.

  6. #16
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    One o the things used to irk me at a previous place of employment was the justification for doing something a particular way was often "we have been doing it that way for 40 years". My response was generally along the lines of "about time we started doing it right then".
    Bob

  7. #17
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    I had been "doing it that way" for years also.

    I only recently learned that while #8 SE is good for 50 amps, # 8 Romex is not.

    Lame.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnConnolly
    ...#8 SE is good for 50 amps...
    How do you figure? :confused:

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by georgestolz
    How do you figure? :confused:

    If both the SE and NM were copper the #8 SE could be used at 75 degrees C or 50 amps. The #8 NM at 60 degrees C or 40 amps.
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by infinity
    If both the SE and NM were copper the #8 SE could be used at 75 degrees C or 50 amps. The #8 NM at 60 degrees C or 40 amps.

    Yeah....what he said.

    A customer called me on it once about 5 years ago and I looked it up. He was right as far as I could tell. That code lingo really confuses me.

    When I started wiring, we didn't HAVE #8 NM, it was all SE style. I assumed for years that #8= 50 amps.

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