110.26(A)(1)

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Little Bill

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How would you go about correcting the 110.26(A)(1) violation created here when a mobile home was set by an existing service and the meter/panel is facing the wrong way? Well facing the wrong way when it's that close. You can barely open the panel and then it rubs the siding and you kind of have to force it open enough to get inside it.
I would like to just turn the meter/panel to the side along with riser and conductors. The bottom/feeder conduit goes to the other side where the former home was. It is useless and will have to be took out.


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Dennis Alwon

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Short of moving the trailer then I would move the panel etc. 90?. Was that the only place they could place the trailer?
 

Hv&Lv

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Will you have enough wire if you move the panel 90 degrees? I can see the riser and the panel would be no problem. Just wondering if the wires going to the trailer would have to be "lengthened".
 

Little Bill

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Short of moving the trailer then I would move the panel etc. 90?. Was that the only place they could place the trailer?

I didn't ask the guy, but my guess as to why they set it there would be that it's on a hill and that was the flatest spot.
That pole was in the way of putting it any further up!:D

Will you have enough wire if you move the panel 90 degrees? I can see the riser and the panel would be no problem. Just wondering if the wires going to the trailer would have to be "lengthened".

There are no wires going to the trailer. That bottom/feeder you see is from the previous home that was moved out. It goes about 10' the other way and is cutoff flush with the ground.
This trailer was fed from the opposite side that you see in the pic. before it was moved. Instead of removing the conductors and swinging the conduit around for transport, the guy's brother just took a saws-all and cut it off.:happyno: It is now useless, I will have to run all new conduit and wires from the service to where it connects in the trailer.
 

don_resqcapt19

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Why not just twist the pole one quarter turn? It couldn?t be that hard, could it?
Have you ever tried that on a pole that has been in the ground for sometime? It can be very difficult, and even harder if you are turning in a direction that will make the overhead drop tighter.
 

Dennis Alwon

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What's wrong with that? It's in a hub.

According to UL White Book hubs are only listed for rigid galvanized pipe & IMC conduit.
Grounding and Bonding Hubs — Grounding and bonding hubs are Listed hubs (see DWTT) provided with a Listed grounding or bonding locknut.
They serve in a manner similar to grounding and bonding bushings except they are only for use with threaded rigid metal and intermediate metal conduit. Grounding hubs provide the electrical continuity required by NEC 250.92 at service equipment and the electrical continuity required by NEC 250.97 for circuits rated over 250 V.
 
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hillbilly1

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According to UL White Book hubs are only listed for rigid galvanized pipe & IMC conduit.

That is not a grounding or bonding use due to the use of PVC which requires no bonding or grounding. Also the hub is bolted without a use of a locknut.
 

Dennis Alwon

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Boy, is that one ignored greatly then I've seen thousands of those done that way. Do they have any logical reason to prohibit it?

I expressed this in another thread. I spoke to a UL guy last March and he said the only reason it is not listed for PVC is that it was never tested for it. He did not see an issue however they only tested it for rigid metal conduit & IMC
 

hillbilly1

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I expressed this in another thread. I spoke to a UL guy last March and he said the only reason it is not listed for PVC is that it was never tested for it. He did not see an issue however they only tested it for rigid metal conduit & IMC

Looks like Carlon or one of the other major PVC manufactures would have got that taken care of?
 

Little Bill

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Why not just twist the pole one quarter turn? It couldn?t be that hard, could it?

Can't tell if you're kidding or not, but you're about the umpteenth person to suggest that.:blink:

I don't know if I can do it or not, but I have a plan. I will have to have POCO cut the drop, then I thought about tying the mast/riser in a few places to keep it from leaning too much, then remove the clamps, take the meter/panel loose, moving it 90degs, and put everything back. I would need a little help with this. I don't know how much the PVC w/conductors weighs.
 
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