110.26 (D), is automatic control REQUIRED?

Merry Christmas
(NEC 2014) 110.26 (D) states that lighting for electrical rooms "shall not be controlled by automatic means only."

Does that mean that automatic control is REQUIRED? Can you use a simple on/off switch and not violate this code?

Need multiple answers/opinions on this, got into a deep discussion with a PE about this particular code.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Retired Electrical Contractor
Imo, It means if you use automatic means then there must also be lighting that is not controlled automatically.
 

Saturn_Europa

Senior Member
Location
Raleigh, NC USA
(NEC 2014) 110.26 (D) states that lighting for electrical rooms "shall not be controlled by automatic means only."

Does that mean that automatic control is REQUIRED? Can you use a simple on/off switch and not violate this code?

Need multiple answers/opinions on this, got into a deep discussion with a PE about this particular code.


http://forums.mikeholt.com/showthread.php?t=184453


2Q==
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Here's the NECH commentary following the code change in the 2011 NEC:

110.26(D) Illumination. Illumination shall be provided for all
working spaces about service equipment, switchboards, panelboards, or motor control centers installed indoors and shall not be controlled by automatic means only. Additional lighting outlets shall not be required where the work space is illuminated by an adjacent light source or as permitted by 210.70(A)(1), Exception No. 1, for switched receptacles.


This section was revised for the 2011 Code. It now requires
working spaces around service equipment, switchboards,
and motor control centers to have a nonautomatic means to
control the lighting. Automatic lighting control through de-
vices such as occupancy sensors and similar devices would
not be prohibited. However, a manual means to bypass the
automatic control would be required.
 

jwelectric

Senior Member
Location
North Carolina
Why do people try to make this so hard?

What has happened to common sense?

I have a 2000 amp 480 volt switch gear open with an ACI of 65k and the lights start going off. If I am the one in the suit I am not going to be very happy at all. :rant:

It makes perfect sense to me to just install a switched receptacle in the electrical room and call it good, or does it? :?

To answer your question, no an automatic means is not required to be installed and if one is installed it cannot control the lights in the area of the switch gear, panel board or motor control center. We don’t want to put anyone who might be servicing this equipment in the dark.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Yes, I have read this commentary before writing the thread.

Do you think this means that automatic control (ie occupancy) is needed/required?

Not required by the NEC, but might be required by some energy code especially in Cali.
 

publicgood

Senior Member
Location
WI, USA
(NEC 2014) 110.26 (D) states that lighting for electrical rooms "shall not be controlled by automatic means only."

Does that mean that automatic control is REQUIRED? Can you use a simple on/off switch and not violate this code?

Need multiple answers/opinions on this, got into a deep discussion with a PE about this particular code.

Pretty straight fwd. Not auto only. Must either have separate non-auto or means to override any installed auto. Doesn’t mean you have to have auto. Doesn’t even mean you have to be able to turn off locally - they could be night lights that are always on. Most energy codes have exceptions for any control of utility rooms and security concerns.
 

steve66

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
Engineer
No, it does NOT mean that automatic control is required. It means what it says: you can't have automatic control only.

Some energy codes require occupancy sensors, but as mentioned above, there is usually an exception that the energy code doesn't apply if its a safety or security issue. The NEC requirement leaves no doubt - using only an occupancy sensor in an electrical room is a safety issue.

A simple toggle switch is fine for an electrical room.

If you install an occupancy sensor and a manual override switch, IMO chances are the janitor will always leave the override switch on, so I usually just show a simple switch on plans.
 

Carultch

Senior Member
Location
Massachusetts
(NEC 2014) 110.26 (D) states that lighting for electrical rooms "shall not be controlled by automatic means only."

Does that mean that automatic control is REQUIRED? Can you use a simple on/off switch and not violate this code?

Need multiple answers/opinions on this, got into a deep discussion with a PE about this particular code.

It means that you need to be able to manually keep the lights on, while working in the room. A simple switch would work, unless there is a compelling reason to do otherwise. You don't want a motion sensor or timer to automatically turn the light off, and leave the worker literally in the dark.
 

Fulthrotl

~Autocorrect is My Worst Enema.~
(NEC 2014) 110.26 (D) states that lighting for electrical rooms "shall not be controlled by automatic means only."

Does that mean that automatic control is REQUIRED? Can you use a simple on/off switch and not violate this code?

Need multiple answers/opinions on this, got into a deep discussion with a PE about this particular code.

you are in so calif. you have T24:2016 to deal with as well as the NEC.
this means your job should have T24:2016 certification BEFORE you get a final electrical.

as this horse was beaten in the other thread, i'll put it this way:

if i was doing the third party certification on this job, i'd want a ceiling mounted motion sensor in
an appropriate location to see the entire room. i'd use more than one, if the room was funny shaped, etc,
and put the sensor(s) over 4' from any air conditioning discharge, if one is present.
i'd use wireless ones, for ease of install. lutron makes nice ones. they work well.

i'd have a switch paired to the ceiling mounted sensors. this way, you can force the light on, or off,
as you see fit. lutron makes a nice wall switch that pairs to those easily. you can see a working demonstration
at any starbucks. look in the bathroom.

if it was an itty bitty panel room, i'd put a wattstopper PW-100, and move on to another adventure.

i'd certify such an installation, and it isn't gonna nuisance trip on you while you are in the room, doing
hot work on the switchgear. not that we do any of that, but in theory.

if you are in such a room configured that way, and are spastic with fear of the lights going off,
plug in a worklight, and take a deep breath.
 
you are in so calif. you have T24:2016 to deal with as well as the NEC.
this means your job should have T24:2016 certification BEFORE you get a final electrical.

Actually, Title 24 2016 for California exempts the use of automatic shut-off (i.e. occupancy sensors) for electrical rooms. However, the automatic shut-off exception in T24:2016 SPECIFICALLY states that "electrical equipment rooms [are] subject to Article 110.26(D)"

You can find this on T24 CEC 2016, pg 155, "Exception 4 to 130.1(c)".

So my question still stands, do you NEED an automatic shut-off (i.e. occupancy sensor) for electrical rooms. So far majority of people say you don't.
 

jap

Senior Member
(NEC 2014) 110.26 (D) states that lighting for electrical rooms "shall not be controlled by automatic means only."

Does that mean that automatic control is REQUIRED? Can you use a simple on/off switch and not violate this code?

Need multiple answers/opinions on this, got into a deep discussion with a PE about this particular code.


No not required.
Yes you can use a simple on/off.

JAP>
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
you are in so calif. you have T24:2016 to deal with as well as the NEC.
this means your job should have T24:2016 certification BEFORE you get a final electrical.

as this horse was beaten in the other thread, i'll put it this way:

if i was doing the third party certification on this job, i'd want a ceiling mounted motion sensor in
an appropriate location to see the entire room. i'd use more than one, if the room was funny shaped, etc,
and put the sensor(s) over 4' from any air conditioning discharge, if one is present.
i'd use wireless ones, for ease of install. lutron makes nice ones. they work well.

i'd have a switch paired to the ceiling mounted sensors. this way, you can force the light on, or off,
as you see fit. lutron makes a nice wall switch that pairs to those easily. you can see a working demonstration
at any starbucks. look in the bathroom
.

if it was an itty bitty panel room, i'd put a wattstopper PW-100, and move on to another adventure.

i'd certify such an installation, and it isn't gonna nuisance trip on you while you are in the room, doing
hot work on the switchgear. not that we do any of that, but in theory.

if you are in such a room configured that way, and are spastic with fear of the lights going off,
plug in a worklight, and take a deep breath.
Any Starbuck's or do we have to go to Starbuck's in CA to see this?

How about a automatic controlled plus a manual controlled light? Asking about compliance with energy codes on this, maybe the manual controlled switch away from usual entry to the room?
 

jap

Senior Member
Why do people try to make this so hard?

What has happened to common sense?

It makes perfect sense to me to just install a switched receptacle in the electrical room and call it good, or does it? :?

To answer your question, no an automatic means is not required to be installed and if one is installed it cannot control the lights in the area of the switch gear, panel board or motor control center. We don’t want to put anyone who might be servicing this equipment in the dark.

I agree an automatic means to control the lighting is not required unless there's a local code which does require it , but, I disagree that it cannot control the lighting in the area of the switchgear, Panel board or Motor Control Center per what the rule states.

The rule states that the lighting shall not be controlled by "Automatic means Only"

so,

Yes, an automatic means can be installed to control the lights in the area of the switchgear, panel board or motor control center, as long as you provide an alternate means to be able to bypass the automated means manually.




JAP>
 

greg.ross

Member
greg.ross

greg.ross

California does not require automatic shut off and we would tell an installer to remove the automatic control to pass inspection.
 
Top