120VDC >To> 120VAC Equipment?

Merry Christmas
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WeThePeople

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I am an Electronic Technician certified up to 200' vessels. When not dealing with the wonders of satelite navigation and radar/sonar I design and implement ship-to-shore systems as well, so after twelve years at it I am used to that end of the market...

My question pertains to the Off-Grid upsprouts appearing everywhere. I am being asked by them about using the 120-VDC battery banks they have.
Charging from windmills, solar, and the local brook seems to be the majority.

They use the DC for all the lights and some other items already so as to avoid inverters..

I work in a 48-VDC >To> 120/240-VAC world...

What brands/models are most popular and accepted by land-based PoCo's as grid backfeed elligible units that use higher than 48-VDC inputs?

As example, older vessels use the brand "Lorain" that accepts 120-VDC.
(All resistive's like heaters, lights, solenoids use battery DC directly)
it is a modified sinewave into isolation transformer type unit.
Averages about 94-96% efficient.
To big and costly for land use though...

I have to figure dealing with Electrical Codes all day every day you may be privy to what popular brands are allowed near the grid. And what brands to avoid due to reputation of cost/failure rate.

Thanks in advance for ideas! :)
 

dereckbc

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Plano, TX
They are numerous but Xantrex and Outback are the most popular brands.
What you have to be careful with is the type of output of Modified Sine Wave. The more samples the closer it comes to replicating a true sinewave. Some things like A/V, data, and iductive loads like motors don't play well with Modified Sine Waves. Xantrex and Outback offer True and Modified Sinewave outputs
 
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tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
Keep in mind there are code rules for DC wiring in structures. Art 720 is circuits and equipment operating at less than 50 volts, it was for the 1920s - 30s farm DC plant. DC 120 Volts would be wired same as a AC 120, right Dereck?, and there is an article on DC battery plants.
 
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