14 Gage splice on a 20 Amp small appliance branch circuit to attach 15 Amp receptacle

Am I correct that 210.19 (A) (2) does not allow 14 Gage conductors to be spliced to 12 Cage conductors for the attachment of a 15 Amp receptacles when they are attached to the 20 Amp small appliance branch circuit of a dwelling?
 

jumper

Senior Member
Am I correct that 210.19 (A) (2) does not allow 14 Gage conductors to be spliced to 12 Cage conductors for the attachment of a 15 Amp receptacles when they are attached to the 20 Amp small appliance branch circuit of a dwelling?
While your assumption that 14# cannot be spliced to a 20A circuit is correct, I think there is a more applicable reference-but I am too tired to find it at the moment. Sorry, brain fart.
 
Am I correct that 210.19 (A) (2) does not allow 14 Gage conductors to be spliced to 12 Cage conductors for the attachment of a 15 Amp receptacles when they are attached to the 20 Amp small appliance branch circuit of a dwelling?
While 14 and 12 can be spliced (as long as the over current device is rated 15 amps or less, the fact that you are referring to a SA circuit would prohibit this.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
240.4(D)(5)
I am going to say (D)(3) instead of (D)(5) for protection of a 14 AWG conductor.


I don't really have much of a problem tapping a 14 AWG as a short pigtail in an outlet box to supply a 15 amp receptacle from a 20 amp circuit, and I think there are situations where it is allowed but would have to be a single outlet and not a multioutlet assembly. Not quite certain on all details at the moment but I'm pretty certain I have done this for luminaires before, and not just a 14 AWG tapped from a 12 AWG but could be done with a 30, 40 or maybe even 50 amp circuit and tap to a 15 amp receptacle for supplying a single luminaire.
 

mwm1752

Senior Member
Location
Aspen, Colo
210.11 Branch Circuits Required
(C) Dwelling Units. (1) Small-Appliance Branch Circuits. In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits shall be provided for all receptacle outlets specified by 210.52(B).
210.52 Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlets
(B) Small Appliances. (1) Receptacle Outlets Served. In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets covered by 210.52(A), all countertop outlets covered by 210.52(C), and receptacle outlets for refrigeration equipment.

210.24 Branch-Circuit Requirements Summary - Does not include 20Amp circuits for such a tap -- ok to use 14ga when pigtailing to a duplex though per TABLE 210.24 Summary of Branch-Circuit Requirements
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Illinois
...
210.24 Branch-Circuit Requirements Summary - Does not include 20Amp circuits for such a tap -- ok to use 14ga when pigtailing to a duplex though per TABLE 210.24 Summary of Branch-Circuit Requirements
The jumper to the receptacle is not a "tap" it is a branch circuit conductor and cannot be smaller than #12 for a 20 amp circuit. The branch circuit taps in Table 210.24 are the taps that are specifically permitted by the exceptions to 210.19(A)(3) and (A)(4).
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Good point - I'll let Kwired respond to his method

Didn't have time earlier when I first mentioned it, but here it is, 410.62(C)(2):

(2) Provided with Mogul-Base, Screw Shell Lampholders. Electric-discharge luminaires provided with mogul-base, screw shell lampholders shall be permitted to be connected to branch circuits of 50 amperes or less by cords complying with 240.5. Receptacles and attachment plugs shall be permitted to be of a lower ampere rating than the branch circuit but not less than 125 percent of the luminaire full-load current.
This is becoming less common as many of the luminaires that were connected in this way are typically being replaced with T5 HO luminaires - which don't meet the requirements of the section, but was common for HID luminaires. I specifically remember one time installing a 30 amp circuit and tapping 15 amp receptacles for each luminaire location, but according to 410.62(C)(2) should be able to do the same for up to a 50 amp circuit.

Of course none of that allows you to do this for the 20 amp small appliance circuits mentioned in the OP.
 
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