2 pole 125V receptacle

jap

Senior Member
I have drawings which show 2 pole 125V receptacle. It is similar to link shown below. Panel schedule show 2 pole breaker with 2 conductors and 1 equipment ground conductor.

Just curious since it’s 2 poles then neutral would not be needed for these receptacles?




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This is a contradiction of terms.
you either have the wrong breaker feeding the receptacle or the wrong receptacle for that circuit.

If the panel shows a 2p breaker with 2 conductors and an equipment ground only, then, the receptacle should be a strictly 208v, 240v, etc.. receptacle. Not 120v

If the receptacle is actually a 2p 3 wire "120v" receptacle,then, 1 of the 2 conductors on the breaker would be on the neutral bar and not the 2nd pole of the breaker.


JAP>
 

hhsting

Senior Member
This is a contradiction of terms.
you either have the wrong breaker feeding the receptacle or the wrong receptacle for that circuit.

If the panel shows a 2p breaker with 2 conductors and an equipment ground only, then, the receptacle should be a strictly 208v, 240v, etc.. receptacle. Not 120v

If the receptacle is actually a 2p 3 wire "120v" receptacle,then, 1 of the 2 conductors on the breaker would be on the neutral bar and not the 2nd pole of the breaker.


JAP>
Correct I understand but if you look at the link provided the heading of receptacle says 125V 2 pole. Second question if one pole of breaker is used wonder what is 2 pole in the heading meant in link?


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jap

Senior Member
So what is 2 poles for in the heading?
on a 125v Receptacle one pole is the " Hot Ungrounded termination point on the receptacle " and the other pole is "Neutral Grounded Conductor termination point on the receptacle" the 3rd wire or equipment grounding conductor lands on the grounding terminal.

on a 240v Receptacle one ungrounded conductor lands on each of the 2 termination poles of the receptacle and the 3rd wire or equipment grounding conductor lands on the equipment grounding terminal of the receptacle.


JAP>
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
If it is a duplex receptacle, you could feed it from both sides of an MWBC with two opposite polarity hots and a neutral. The tab would be broken off and one hot would feed each half of the duplex. Probably not what the designer intended, but a possible explanation for the combination of labeling and schematic.
 

roger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Fl
Occupation
Electrician
I have drawings which show 2 pole 125V receptacle. It is similar to link shown below. Panel schedule show 2 pole breaker with 2 conductors and 1 equipment ground conductor.
Similar doesn't mean anything, what did the designer specify?

Roger
 

jap

Senior Member
If it is a duplex receptacle, you could feed it from both sides of an MWBC with two opposite polarity hots and a neutral. The tab would be broken off and one hot would feed each half of the duplex. Probably not what the designer intended, but a possible explanation for the combination of labeling and schematic.
You could, but, in that instance the diagram should show "3" conductors and an equipment grounding conductor.
Not 2 conductors and an equipment grounding conductor as was indicated in the original post.

JAP>
 

RRJ

Member
Location
atlanta georgia
Occupation
Electrician
Correct I understand but if you look at the link provided the heading of receptacle says 125V 2 pole. Second question if one pole of breaker is used wonder what is 2 pole in the heading meant in link?


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The person doing the drawings made a mistake and you are probably catching the confusion where they might have seen the label in the receptacle 2 pole meaning two prone but on the breaker meaning something totally different. I agree with the posts before. It has to be one or the other 2 pole breaker 250v receptacle or single pole breaker 125v receptacle.


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synchro

Senior Member
Location
Chicago, IL
Occupation
EE
My understanding is that a "pole" is a distinct leg of a switch, breaker, or disconnect (which includes receptacles) that connects/disconnects one terminal to/from one or more other terminals.
And so a 2-pole double throw (DPDT) switch has 6 terminals but two distinct legs or poles, with each pole having a common terminal that can be connected to one of two other terminals. A typical 120V/240V transfer switch is DPDT because the neutral is not switched.
A 125V receptacle is 2-pole because it allows both the neutral and hot conductor to be disconnected.
It is fed by a 1-pole breaker because the neutral conductor is not switched or disconnected.
 
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roger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Fl
Occupation
Electrician
My understanding is that a "pole" is a distinct leg of a switch, breaker, or disconnect (which includes receptacles) that connects/disconnects one terminal to/from one or more other terminals.
And so a 2-pole double throw (DPDT) switch has 6 terminals but two distinct legs or poles, with each pole having a common terminal that can be connected to one of two other terminals. A typical 120V/240V transfer switch is DPDT because the neutral is not switched.
A 125V receptacle is 2-pole because it allows both the neutral and hot conductor to be disconnected.
It is fed by a 1-pole breaker because the neutral conductor is not switched or disconnected.
It might be best to let the OP tell us what the designer actually showed on the panelboard loads and what he/she called out for the receptacles. Once again, similar doesn't tell us anything, the receptacle linked to in the OP's first post is similar to a 250V duplex receptacle. One problem here is that the OP is trying to review drawings as a contractor to an AHJ based on what input he/she gets from an internet forum.

Roger
 

Another C10

Electrical Contractor 1987 - present
Location
Southern Cal
Occupation
Electrician NEC 2020
It may of been explained by others but it looks like it can be fed as a 125v 15A Hot Neut or a 125v 20A Hot Neut. based on the hot terminal configurations, if breaking the tabs there could then be 2 separate poles ... ya cant rely on an editors description, always research ... google is a great library, just look for consistencies when researching.
 

winnie

Senior Member
Location
Springfield, MA, USA
Occupation
Electric motor research
I think this is a terminology issue.

If you look at the NEMA plug configuration charts, the number of 'poles' is the number of circuit conductors. In this terminology a 5-15 receptacle is 2 pole 3 wire. A 6-15 is also 2 pole 3 wire.

Thus a two pole three wire 5-15 receptacle will be supplied by a circuit with 1 hot, 1 neutral, and 1 egc, fed by a single pole breaker.

Jon
 

winnie

Senior Member
Location
Springfield, MA, USA
Occupation
Electric motor research
While it is most likely that the issue is that the plans are wrong to say 2 pole breaker, it is just barely possible that the designer really wants both hot and neutral protected/opened by the breaker.

NEC generally prohibits switching the neutral, but it is allowed if hot and neutral are switched at the same time.

You can even buy special breakers to accomplish this in an ordinary panel:
https://www.westsidewholesale.com/siemens-qg220.html

Jon
 

ptonsparky

Senior Member
Location
NE (9.06 miles @5.9 Degrees from Winged Horses)
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
While it is most likely that the issue is that the plans are wrong to say 2 pole breaker, it is just barely possible that the designer really wants both hot and neutral protected/opened by the breaker.

NEC generally prohibits switching the neutral, but it is allowed if hot and neutral are switched at the same time.

You can even buy special breakers to accomplish this in an ordinary panel:
https://www.westsidewholesale.com/siemens-qg220.html

Jon
Switched neutral breakers are commonly available at supply houses. OPs designer may have had a slight case of HUA syndrome, but they may have reason why.
 
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