200.6 letter of the code vs. intent of the code?

rubob

Member
I have done an installation in a commercial building with a 400 amp single phase service that is the only service on the building. Inside I used both white and gray for my neutrals thinking it would make it easier to group my neutrals with their ungrounded conductors. I failed inspection because, to his credit, the inspector pointed out to me that 200.6 states that 'An insulated grounded conductor of 6AWG or smaller shall be identified by ONE of...
When you read that section I can't believe that is the intent of the code because there will be situations where you can't have just one of those choices in a building. Should that read ANY or should I start pulling half my neutrals out to replace them with a single color?
I understand that it would be a different situation if there were multiple voltage systems present.
 

480sparky

Senior Member
The grey wire is identified by one of the methods. The white wire is identified by one of the methods.

I agree it's an incorrect interpretation of the Code.
 

ActionDave

Moderator
Staff member
I agree with the others, the inspector is wrong in his interpretation. I pull grey and white all the time to identify different circuits or line and load or even just because that's what is on the truck closest to the tailgate. You are not required to use white or grey exclusively unless you have circuits from different systems in the same pipe.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Agreed. Tell him that each neutral is identified in only one way.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
The grey wire is identified by one of the methods. The white wire is identified by one of the methods.

I agree it's an incorrect interpretation of the Code.
Yes, I agree also. I wonder why someone who's an inspector would ever object have gray and white neutrals when there is only one system. This is inspection 101 for a commercial inspector. :?
 

kwired

Electron manager
Yes, I agree also. I wonder why someone who's an inspector would ever object have gray and white neutrals when there is only one system. This is inspection 101 for a commercial inspector. :?
And if you had more than two systems you need more identification methods than just gray vs white.

I also agree with others that with one system either color can be used at same time.
 

rubob

Member
THANK-YOU for your help! I so much appreciate the forum and the input of my peers, it is a great resource.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
And if you had more than two systems you need more identification methods than just gray vs white.

I also agree with others that with one system either color can be used at same time.
I believe that changed a few code cycles ago, now gray and white are acceptable to distinguish the neutral conductors of each system.
 

kwired

Electron manager
I believe that changed a few code cycles ago, now gray and white are acceptable to distinguish the neutral conductors of each system.
Not what I was getting at. If you have two different voltage systems common practice is to use gray for one and white for the other.

My point was if if there is more than two voltage systems, there is only two colors that can be used for grounded conductors and you must have an id method that goes beyond color alone.
 

kwired

Electron manager
I believe that changed a few code cycles ago, now gray and white are acceptable to distinguish the neutral conductors of each system.
Not what I was getting at. If you have two different voltage systems common practice is to use gray for one and white for the other.

My point was if if there is more than two voltage systems, there is only two colors that can be used for grounded conductors and you must have an id method that goes beyond color alone.

Nothing requires us to use white for 120 and gray for 277, it is just common practice. You could use white (and/or gray) for all grounded conductors and identify the system they belong to with other methods.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Not what I was getting at. If you have two different voltage systems common practice is to use gray for one and white for the other.

My point was if if there is more than two voltage systems, there is only two colors that can be used for grounded conductors and you must have an id method that goes beyond color alone.

Nothing requires us to use white for 120 and gray for 277, it is just common practice. You could use white (and/or gray) for all grounded conductors and identify the system they belong to with other methods.
You're correct I missed the more than part. :ashamed1:
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
I have done an installation in a commercial building with a 400 amp single phase service that is the only service on the building. Inside I used both white and gray for my neutrals thinking it would make it easier to group my neutrals with their ungrounded conductors. I failed inspection because, to his credit, the inspector pointed out to me that 200.6 states that 'An insulated grounded conductor of 6AWG or smaller shall be identified by ONE of...
When you read that section I can't believe that is the intent of the code because there will be situations where you can't have just one of those choices in a building. Should that read ANY or should I start pulling half my neutrals out to replace them with a single color?
I understand that it would be a different situation if there were multiple voltage systems present.
You tell those boys in Asheville that Roger says they are off on this one.... :lol:
 

roger

Moderator
Staff member
You tell those boys in Asheville that Roger says they are off on this one.... :lol:
:thumbsup:

Most of the Asheville inspectors were top of the line over the years, they knew the code and were always willing to discuss and even change their call if wrong however, there use to be one that didn't fit that description, don't know if he's still there.


Roger​
 
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