250.104

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normbac

Senior Member
In a residence are there any codes that prohibit bonding to the gas pipe in the attic 250.104 says it needs to be accesssible. The inspector does not like the location, but there is an attic crawl space.

Seperate question in reading 250.104 (B) it seems to say that the bonding conductor should be based on branch circuit wires that may energize the pipe is that correct. Seems they are refering to individual circuits that may come in contact. I always thought it was based on the main panel feeders?

(The bonding jumper(s) shall be sized in accordance with 250.122 using the rating of the circuit that may energize the piping system(s).)
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Around here the gas pipe is bonded indirectly by the EGC of the circuit supplying and bonding the gas appliance. So a gas boiler with a 15 amp circuit and a #14 EGC is all that's required to bond the gas pipe.
 

Cavie

Senior Member
normbac said:
In a residence are there any codes that prohibit bonding to the gas pipe in the attic 250.104 says it needs to be accesssible. The inspector does not like the location, but there is an attic crawl space.

Seperate question in reading 250.104 (B) it seems to say that the bonding conductor should be based on branch circuit wires that may energize the pipe is that correct. Seems they are refering to individual circuits that may come in contact. I always thought it was based on the main panel feeders?

(The bonding jumper(s) shall be sized in accordance with 250.122 using the rating of the circuit that may energize the piping system(s).)
I try to discourage it but it is accessible as per code.
 

normbac

Senior Member
walkerj said:
I bond it from the #12 or #14 from the outlet serving the furnace or water heater
Are you saying that you crimp a bare wire out of your outlet then bond it to the pipe?

Oops misread the post!!
 
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Cavie

Senior Member
walkerj said:
I bond it from the #12 or #14 from the outlet serving the furnace or water heater
Manufacturer installations instructions call for flexible gas pipe to be bonded to the service by #6 sol wire.
 

DaveTap

Senior Member
walkerj said:
I bond it from the #12 or #14 from the outlet serving the furnace or water heater
Typically the gas pipe is bonded by the furnace since most places don't allow them to be connected w/fllex. The pipe connects to the gas valve which typically has a ground wire and the valve connects to a header which is screwed to the body of the furnace. But I've never heard that was allowed for the NEC bonding requirement.
 

normbac

Senior Member
How do you guys read the sizing in 250.104 (B) if gas pipe is in numerous locations in the attic and floor joists and wires of all sizes are near or touching are you taking the largest branch circuit and sizing it per 250.122
 

walkerj

Senior Member
normbac said:
Are you saying that you crimp a bare wire out of your outlet then bond it to the pipe?
I have seen it done that way.
or straight from the cold water pipe at the gas fired water heater.
I think a #6 is a little overkill though
 

walkerj

Senior Member
I read it as the largest egc from whatever circuits would enrgize it.
For instance, a flexible cord shorting out on the furnace. The #14 or #12 ground would clear the fault of that 15 or 20 amp circuit.
But i never run anything in close proximity to gas lines. I know it's not required, but gas + sparks + open air=bad news
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
If one only has a gas range and it is plugged into a 15 or 20 amp receptace then the gas pipe is directly bonded thru that circuit. If the gas stove is unplugged then the bonding disappears. This seems odd to me.

I just heard that a local county here in NC is requiring bonding according to 250.66 for any gas piping in the building. Not just for the CSST piping.
 

normbac

Senior Member
So am I reading this incorrectly it seems to say the bond must be permanent

shall be bonded to the service equipment enclosure, the grounded conductor at the service, the grounding electrode conductor where of sufficient size, or to the one or more grounding electrodes used.
 

electricmanscott

Senior Member
Cavie said:
Manufacturer installations instructions call for flexible gas pipe to be bonded to the service by #6 sol wire.

The next time I install some flexible gas pipe I'll keep this in mind.
Otherwise if the installer of the gas pipe wants to hire me to bond their material per their instructions I'll worry about it then.

You CAN NOT cite 110.3 (B) for everything that is installed within a building ESPECIALLY when it is not even electrically related.
 

electricmanscott

Senior Member
infinity said:
Around here the gas pipe is bonded indirectly by the EGC of the circuit supplying and bonding the gas appliance. So a gas boiler with a 15 amp circuit and a #14 EGC is all that's required to bond the gas pipe.

This is the correct answer for anybody under the NEC. No need to do anything else.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Cavie said:
Manufacturer installations instructions call for flexible gas pipe to be bonded to the service by #6 sol wire.
This is not always the case I have seen manufacturers info state that it shall be bonded per 250.66.

Edit to add

omegaflex said:
H. Protection for Gas Piping Systems in High Lightning Strike Regions
omegaflex said:
TracPipe CounterStrike
Model Number(s) FGP-CS-375 FGP-CS-500 FGP-CS-750
FGP-CS-100 FGP-CS-125 FGP-CS-150 FGP-CS-200
H.1 Primary protection from lightning near strikes for all metallic systems within a
building is recommended to be provided by proper grounding of the electrical
system and equipotential bonding of all metallic systems including the gas piping
system. Grounding and bonding shall be in accordance with the National
Electrical Code ANSI/NFPA 70.
H.2 The installation of a lightning protection system per NFPA 780 is
recommended in areas prone to a high level of lightning strikes to protect the
building In the event of a direct strike.
H.3 CounterStrike shall consist of TracPipe stainless steel pressure liner and
an engineered polymer jacket. The jacket shall be designed to enhance the
energy dissipating properties of the flexible gas piping. CounterStrike shall be
tested by a recognized lightning laboratory. In lightning prone areas,
Counterstrike is recommended for an additional level of gas piping system
protection from indirect strikes.
H.4 The use of CounterStrike shall be coupled with equipotential bonding of the
gas piping system and all other metallic systems to the grounding electrode in
accordance with NEC Section 250.104. The bonding jumper should be sized in
accordance with NEC Table 250.66
 
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walkerj

Senior Member
What if the gas line only serves gas lanterns or straight gas water heaters, nothing gas with elec. ignitors. What should be done in that case?
 

normbac

Senior Member
electricmanscott said:
This is the correct answer for anybody under the NEC. No need to do anything else.
So if you have a oven that is say 40 amp are you suppose to run a # 10 from the outlet or panel etc; per table 250.122 to wherever it can be accessible? Need clarity on this so I can argue my point to an inspector TIA
 

Cavie

Senior Member
electricmanscott said:
Can I ask why you do this and where you get the authority to do so?
I simply sugest it be done in a more accessable mannor and most do not complain and agree. I do not insist it not be done. It is accessable in the attic.
 
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