314.17(B) and 334.15(C)

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ivsenroute

Senior Member
Location
Florida
This home was being flipped and the range was being moved to another location. This is in a crawlspace.

If you were the EC would you think that this is one violation or two?

Which of the above NEC references do you think applies best?

 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
I can't really tell if 334.15(C) is affected but taping the NM cable appears to be an issue. It is one thing to tape over a bad spot on the cable ( a nic or cut in the jacket but in this case the tape is used as a raceway.
 

Howard Burger

Senior Member
taping NM

taping NM

Dennis - I just removed an old Pushmatic panel in a '67 built home. The new CH panel is 3 in. shorter, hence some of my NM are stripped above the top of the panel. I planned Monday to use linerless rubber tape over the wires followed by Scotch 88 over that. The NM will be secured with staples within a foot of the top of the new panel. I'm basically replacing the '67 covering with current issue stuff in sufficient amounts to protect the wires from the plastic connectors I'm putting in the top of the panel. Do you see any problem whith that?

Alternatively, I've thought I could stub up EMT out the top of the panel for 4 in. or so and sleeve the stripped NM in that, stapling the NM above the pipe, but that seems like overkill.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Dennis - I just removed an old Pushmatic panel in a '67 built home. The new CH panel is 3 in. shorter, hence some of my NM are stripped above the top of the panel. I planned Monday to use linerless rubber tape over the wires followed by Scotch 88 over that. The NM will be secured with staples within a foot of the top of the new panel. I'm basically replacing the '67 covering with current issue stuff in sufficient amounts to protect the wires from the plastic connectors I'm putting in the top of the panel. Do you see any problem whith that?
I have done similar things. I stripped a piece of NM cable and slid it over the wires then used tape where it overlapped. That is very different, IMO, then what the OP showed. I am not familiar with linerless rubber tape. I would install it with an approved NM insulation.


Alternatively, I've thought I could stub up EMT out the top of the panel for 4 in. or so and sleeve the stripped NM in that, stapling the NM above the pipe, but that seems like overkill.
I don't think that would be a legal install
 

Howard Burger

Senior Member
D - check last pph of334.30 (A) and 250.86 Ex. 2.

The linerless tape is a rubber concoction that is real flexible, stretches even, and is superb as a first layer for splicing; its also cool as a substitue for friction tape if you need a grip on hacksaw handles etc. Good stuff, bit pricy, but worth it.
 
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jaylectricity

Senior Member
Location
Massachusetts
great picture of why I ALWAYS bring 5 extra feet of cable as opposed to ending up 5 inches too short!
I don't think that's the issue. If the electrician hadn't stripped the wire back too far, there would be no need for the tape. If it was already stripped for whatever reason, It looks like it bends around to reach for a further knockout than necessary. One of those knockouts on the side opposite the joist probably could have been reached more easily.
 
I don't think that's the issue. If the electrician hadn't stripped the wire back too far, there would be no need for the tape. If it was already stripped for whatever reason, It looks like it bends around to reach for a further knockout than necessary. One of those knockouts on the side opposite the joist probably could have been reached more easily.

OP says existing range got moved to another location....you're looking at a new junction box. why on earth would (even a total hack) anyone leave that wire like that unless they ran short????:confused: I guess I just can't imagine any other reason.
 

jaylectricity

Senior Member
Location
Massachusetts
OP says existing range got moved to another location....you're looking at a new junction box. why on earth would (even a total hack) anyone leave that wire like that unless they ran short????:confused: I guess I just can't imagine any other reason.
If the 6/3 NM we're looking at is the new cable, then why didn't they just pull an extra two feet? If the 6/3 NM is the old cable, why didn't they put the box somewhere that actually reached the old cable and run the new cable from there?
 
If the 6/3 NM we're looking at is the new cable, then why didn't they just pull an extra two feet? If the 6/3 NM is the old cable, why didn't they put the box somewhere that actually reached the old cable and run the new cable from there?

Exactly what I'm saying.....how could anyone conceivably leave this install like that unless they decided they needed 18' (for example), went out and bought 18', then found out they really needed 20'.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Exactly what I'm saying.....how could anyone conceivably leave this install like that unless they decided they needed 18' (for example), went out and bought 18', then found out they really needed 20'.
The cable in the pic isn't taut enough to support that theory. :cool:
 
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