480V vs 400V in Industrial Application

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AAEB

Member
Location
Southeast Asia
Good Day!

Guys, what is more advantageous in Industrial Application when it comes to voltage system utilization? is it 480V,3p or 400V, 3p?

thanks in advance,
AAEB
 

Jraef

Moderator
Staff member
Location
San Francisco Bay Area, CA, USA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
You have a choice?

Generally you don't. Your local utility has essentially made that decision for you. But if you are in the US, don't use 400V, it will be very difficult to find equipment for it. Yes, 480V gear will work, but you might as well then use 480V everything. But transformers and motors are not going to be as readily available in 400V versions.

If you are not in the US or Canada, I would check into what everyone around you uses. It's not a good idea to set yourself up as a virtual electrical island, isolated from everyone else.
 

Little Bill

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Staff member
Location
Tennessee NEC:2017
Occupation
Electrician
Good Day!

Guys, what is more advantageous in Industrial Application when it comes to voltage system utilization? is it 480V,3p or 400V, 3p?


thanks in advance,
AAEB

I don't know about advantageous but it seems (at least in my application) a lot of European machines, especially Italian and French made, require 400V. We had to have transformers for them since we only had 208V. Some of the manufacturers sold or supplied the transformers. Can't remember having to try and buy one in the States.

You have a choice?

Generally you don't. Your local utility has essentially made that decision for you. But if you are in the US, don't use 400V, it will be very difficult to find equipment for it. Yes, 480V gear will work, but you might as well then use 480V everything. But transformers and motors are not going to be as readily available in 400V versions.

If you are not in the US or Canada, I would check into what everyone around you uses. It's not a good idea to set yourself up as a virtual electrical island, isolated from everyone else.
Right, depends on your machines/needs in your application, but US machines mainly require 480V.
 

stew

Senior Member
In the US we have motors rated 240/ 480 60 cycle. In some other countries the standard is 200/400 50 cycyle. 380 50 cycle nameplate ratings are common overseas which is equated to 460 60 cycle here. motors rated 380 50 cycle can be operated on 460/60 cycle with no problem and vice versa.
 

Jraef

Moderator
Staff member
Location
San Francisco Bay Area, CA, USA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
In the US we have motors rated 240/ 480 60 cycle. In some other countries the standard is 200/400 50 cycyle. 380 50 cycle nameplate ratings are common overseas which is equated to 460 60 cycle here. motors rated 380 50 cycle can be operated on 460/60 cycle with no problem and vice versa.
"No problem" is a bit of a stretch, there are potential problems that need consideration, but generally it's OK.
 

Besoeker

Senior Member
Location
UK
In the US we have motors rated 240/ 480 60 cycle. In some other countries the standard is 200/400 50 cycyle. 380 50 cycle nameplate ratings are common overseas which is equated to 460 60 cycle here. motors rated 380 50 cycle can be operated on 460/60 cycle with no problem and vice versa.
The common standard voltage in Europe is 400V 3ph 50Hz with 230Vph-n (not 200V) which is the phase to neutral of the 400V line to line voltage.
 

Electric-Light

Senior Member
In large industrial, you can choose whatever voltage as the electricity is purchased in medium voltage from which it is stepped down to whatever by customer owned transformer.
 

Besoeker

Senior Member
Location
UK
In large industrial, you can choose whatever voltage as the electricity is purchased in medium voltage from which it is stepped down to whatever by customer owned transformer.
I suppose you could but generally you wouldn't except maybe for single pieces of equipment that need non-standard voltages.
 
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