70E and metal framed glasses

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Electrobe

Member
NFPA 70E 130.6(D) states that metal framed glasses can not be worn where they present an electrical contact hazard with exposed energized electical conductors or circuit parts.

Is this saying that you can not wear metal framed glasses at all or would restrained metal framed glasses be OK?

Thanks
 

wawireguy

Senior Member
I don't know about you but I'm not going to put my face that close to anything that's live so I'd say there isn't a contact hazard with them.
 

eric9822

Senior Member
Location
Camarillo, CA
We have debated this for years where I work. My opinion; If the material your spectacle frames are made of makes a difference you are well into the prohibited approach boundary.
 

mxstar211

Member
Location
Hawaii
NFPA 70E 130.6(D) states that metal framed glasses can not be worn where they present an electrical contact hazard with exposed energized electical conductors or circuit parts.

Is this saying that you can not wear metal framed glasses at all or would restrained metal framed glasses be OK?

Thanks
I would say can not be worn at all. When working around live parts there is always the chance you can slip or accidently move your face too close to the live parts.
 

TxEngr

Senior Member
Location
North Florida
This is a significant problem since most prescription glasses come in metal frames. If your working in HC2 areas, you should have a face shield or hood on and the glasses are no longer a hazard since they are covered, just like any other metallic objects such as keys that if covered or placed in a pocket are no longer considered a hazard. If working where you don't have a face shield, this presents a hazard and 70E specifically calls out metal frame glasses as a risk. Until safety glasses start coming in plastic prescription styles, this will probably be one of the most violated parts of 70E.
 

celtic

Senior Member
Location
NJ
This is a significant problem since most prescription glasses come in metal frames.

..............

Until safety glasses start coming in plastic prescription styles, this will probably be one of the most violated parts of 70E.

There are plenty of metal-free safety glasses - both prescript. and non-prescript. - available.
One just needs to look a little deeper.
 

bobsherwood

Senior Member
Location
Dallas TX
While replacing a breaker (years ago) I watched as the bolt in single 20 amp breaker cracked and then crossed phases. Boss would not allow turning off the light in the library.. turn out I turn off several! ouch! I was wearing soft contacts. the first thing I did was make sure they where still loose on my eyes.... thank the Lord they were! Had RK surgery shortly after. Of course that was in the day... we work NOTHING hot now.
 

TxEngr

Senior Member
Location
North Florida
Celtic - you're correct in that they are available. Just the places most companies send you and will pay for the glasses provide the metal frames. We just need to start a culture change with our safety departments and have them offer the better alternatives and pay for them.
 

cornbread

Senior Member
Metal frame is a no go for me. Many years ago I had a pair slip off my head when I sneezed and naturally if fell on top of a motor contactor. No one was hurt but but my safety glasses and underwear had to be replaced.
 

wawireguy

Senior Member
I'd probably invest in polymer tools also. Wouldn't want that metal tool getting near anything electrical either.. : )
 

celtic

Senior Member
Location
NJ
Celtic - you're correct in that they are available. Just the places most companies send you and will pay for the glasses provide the metal frames. We just need to start a culture change with our safety departments and have them offer the better alternatives and pay for them.

I disagree.

The safety depts. need to understand what OSHA's General Duty clause encompasses....it's actually THEIR job
 

wtucker

Senior Member
Location
Connecticut
General duty? How 'bout specific duty: 1926.102(a)(1) Employees shall be provided with eye and face protection equipment when machines or operations present potential eye or face injury from physical, chemical, or radiation agents.

But don't be so quick to blame the safety dep't. To be generous, it could be that they're human and simply overlooked the issue (which is probably the case here, because cost certainly isn't an issue). Could be that they're poorly trained for the job, that they were working stiffs who got stuck with the job because the boss wanted to shed his responsibility. Could be that they are trained and did recognize the problem, but the actual decisions were made by the big boss, and the safety dep't is taking the heat. And it could be that they were getting so much push-back from employees that they gave up.

More to the point, to say that safety is "their job" is to deny personal responsibility. We are each responsible for our own safety. If that means politely describing the problem to someone who ought to have recognized it already, so be it. If that means raising a stink with the boss (or with OSHA), so be it. If that means taking the time to do things safely when the boss is pushing production, so be it. If that means finding another employer, so be it.
 
Worn metal frames for years, not going to change. I've had two RK operations and I'm one of thecandidates that the eye keeps changing to much, so stuck with a glass lense in front of the face.

As long as ANSI approves what is out there, I will continue to wear my metal frames. I contend that it is personal choice, unless a contractor buys and requires you to wear them while on their clock. I detest laws supporting nanny state-ism. People need to take responsibility for theirselves.
 

zog

Senior Member
Location
Charlotte, NC
I don't know about you but I'm not going to put my face that close to anything that's live so I'd say there isn't a contact hazard with them.
The "contact hazard" is when they fall off your face into the energized thing you are working on or near, thats why the requirement is either non conductive frames or a laynard if conductive frames are used.
 
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