7100 sq foot house

Pjm 63

Member
All,

Im looking at a remodel in a 7100 sq foot house. I noticed when I did a job walkthrough all of the existing wiring was done in commercial grade material( flex, mc cable, EMT). I was planning on bidding this job in romex and was wondering if there is a code that states after a certain square foot you have to change to commercial grade material. Has anyone herd or this? thanks in advance
 

luckylerado

Senior Member
All,

Im looking at a remodel in a 7100 sq foot house. I noticed when I did a job walkthrough all of the existing wiring was done in commercial grade material( flex, mc cable, EMT). I was planning on bidding this job in romex and was wondering if there is a code that states after a certain square foot you have to change to commercial grade material. Has anyone herd or this? thanks in advance
No. Not the NEC. Maybe a local code? May have just hired a commercial guy to do the rough in. I work with some guys that would use EMT in their home which makes no sense to me.
 

tkb

Senior Member
They may want the method to match the existing.
If you bid NM and get the job they may try to make you use MC.

Either you need to clairify the method or qualify your method in your bid.
There may be specifications on the drawings that would tell you what method that they want.
 

mgookin

Senior Member
All,

Im looking at a remodel in a 7100 sq foot house. I noticed when I did a job walkthrough all of the existing wiring was done in commercial grade material( flex, mc cable, EMT). I was planning on bidding this job in romex and was wondering if there is a code that states after a certain square foot you have to change to commercial grade material. Has anyone herd or this? thanks in advance
The construction type under the building code determines what wiring method is allowed. A single family is Group R-3.

Group R-3 is allowed in Type V construction up to 3 stories.
More than 3 stories needs to be Type IV minimum.

How many stories is your building?
And who knows what article in the NEC regulates this?
 

JFletcher

Senior Member
Never heard of a house of a certain sq ft needing other than nm. Ask the HO; perhaps he specced MC/EMT in the build.
 

growler

Senior Member
Depending on where you live you may be required to use conduit -- in Chicago homes are wired in conduit
He said they were also useing MC cable so it's probably not Chicago.

I would want to clear this up with the jurisdiction where the permit is to be pulled and also the owner/contractor. There are people that used to live in the Chicago area and think that conduit is the way to go and are willing to pay for it ( but that may have been a past owner).
 

kwired

Electron manager
No. Not the NEC. Maybe a local code? May have just hired a commercial guy to do the rough in. I work with some guys that would use EMT in their home which makes no sense to me.
I use EMT in dwellings - typically for select areas where the installation is exposed though, but not as the general wiring method for everything.
 

cowboyjwc

Moderator
Staff member
If people would just fill in the "Location" part when they sign up, it sure would make it easier to answer some of the questions we get.
 

tkb

Senior Member
If people would just fill in the "Location" part when they sign up, it sure would make it easier to answer some of the questions we get.
It should be a required field. :happyyes:
There are many time when I skip a question because it is to vague, or location specific without a location given.
 

Strathead

Senior Member
The construction type under the building code determines what wiring method is allowed. A single family is Group R-3.

Group R-3 is allowed in Type V construction up to 3 stories.
More than 3 stories needs to be Type IV minimum.

How many stories is your building?
And who knows what article in the NEC regulates this?
If you are asking what article regulates construction types, it is not the NEC, but the building code.
 

cowboyjwc

Moderator
Staff member
It should be a required field. :happyyes:
There are many time when I skip a question because it is to vague, or location specific without a location given.
Yep don't have to give us a home address :happyno: but a state would help from time to time.
 

mgookin

Senior Member
If you are asking what article regulates construction types, it is not the NEC, but the building code.
There's an NEC article which dictates when NM can be used in a building, and it is based on construction types.

The information I cited was from the building code. I was asking who knows what article in the NEC addresses whether NM is allowed based on the type of construction.

Edit: It's Article 334.
OP is fine.
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
BTW, the exact NEC wording is based on the required construction type (for the occupancy) not on the construction type actually used.
 

mgookin

Senior Member
BTW, the exact NEC wording is based on the required construction type (for the occupancy) not on the construction type actually used.
Single family is allowed to have NM without respect to construction type (or allowed construction type).

Thanks for the clarification.
 
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