ADA compliant residence

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cadpoint

Senior Member
Location
Durham, NC
Downloadable PDF 4.5 Mb file making up 92 pages, drawings start about page 16.
Make sure your Adobe Reader is up to date, one can preview and print and not download the whole document.

ADF.GOV = ADA Standards for Accessible Design

The drawings with show you all the limitations of wheel chair and human motion limits.
 
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bphgravity

Senior Member
Location
Florida
Keep in mind that while compliance with the 1990 American Disabilities Act is mandatory, many states have provisions that supplement and / or are more stringent than federal guidelines. See Chapter 11 of the IBC.
 

cadpoint

Senior Member
Location
Durham, NC
Keep in mind that while compliance with the 1990 American Disabilities Act is mandatory, many states have provisions that supplement and / or are more stringent than federal guidelines. See Chapter 11 of the IBC.

That’s an excellent point!

Not to get into a tit for tat, Do check with your State health or even state mental health boards.

Carefully read all of the following; New ADA Accessibility Guidelines Side-by-Side Comparison

Section #2 is important because the OP said persons
 
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LawnGuyLandSparky

Senior Member
I'm looking for basic pointers or rules of thumb. I bought a house and I'm gutting and renovating it for an aquaitnence who had a stroke and is confned to a wheelchair, possibly for life. His rent will be subsidized by the FDNY and another agency. There are stories all over about returning Afganistan war vets who are also in the predicament that they cannot find accomodations they can live with. I already got the 32" interior door minimum width, the 5' clear space within bathrooms, and switch / outlet heights are pretty obvious... but how does one design or build a kitchen or a laundry room a person in a wheelchair could use?
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Keep in mind that while compliance with the 1990 American Disabilities Act is mandatory, many states have provisions that supplement and / or are more stringent than federal guidelines. See Chapter 11 of the IBC.


New Jersey has their own requirements, a condensed version of the Federal ADA called Barrier Free installations.
 

LawnGuyLandSparky

Senior Member
Do you want to be ADA compliant, see above, or are you looking for empirical advice? I ask because a relative was in a wheelchair and had a lot of pet peeves?

Empirical advice. I'm not looking to "certify" or actually officially comply with anything, other than build 2 apartments people in wheelchairs or with physical disabilities can live a barrier-free lifestyle in.

Without ending up with a sterile hospice-like enviroment... My biggest stumbling block seems to be the kitchen range and sink, can't have upper cabinets, need short refrigerators, front-loading laundry, no doorknobs, no doorway thresholds...
 

cadpoint

Senior Member
Location
Durham, NC
Empirical advice. I'm not looking to "certify" or actually officially comply with anything, other than build 2 apartments people in wheelchairs or with physical disabilities can live a barrier-free lifestyle in.

Without ending up with a sterile hospice-like enviroment... My biggest stumbling block seems to be the kitchen range and sink, can't have upper cabinets, need short refrigerators, front-loading laundry, no doorknobs, no doorway thresholds...

You might go and contact a teacher of a drafting class or architecture class and see if some students can help with a layout and arragement. Most times these classes need a project, and the real part of helping someone alone the way is just a pure joy, verses drawing nuts and bolts, or their own future dream home.

If your use your favorite search engine and put ada oven, or ada (keyword), there will be pages and pages on any of these terms that seem to be a problem.

Countertops and sinks shall be mounted
at a maximum height of 34 in (865 mm) above
the floor. At least fifty percent of shelf space in
cabinets or refrigerator/freezers shall be within
the reach ranges of 4.2.5 or 4.2.6 and space
shall be designed to allow for the operation of
cabinet and/or appliance doors so that all
cabinets and appliances are accessible and
usable. Controls and operating mechanisms
shall comply with 4.27.
From page 65 of my first link. you can also search that link by a keyword.

I can only commend you for your efforts, but sometimes one has to use other avenues to get where they need to go!
 

specgrade

Member
I'm looking for basic pointers or rules of thumb. I bought a house and I'm gutting and renovating it for an aquaitnence who had a stroke and is confned to a wheelchair, possibly for life. His rent will be subsidized by the FDNY and another agency. There are stories all over about returning Afganistan war vets who are also in the predicament that they cannot find accomodations they can live with. I already got the 32" interior door minimum width, the 5' clear space within bathrooms, and switch / outlet heights are pretty obvious... but how does one design or build a kitchen or a laundry room a person in a wheelchair could use?

Be sure to ask him what his needs are and what abilities he still has. He will probably clue you in on some things you and I wouldn't even think of since we aren't living life in a wheelchair. I suppose you could get a wheelchair a go around looking at things from his point of view. Good luck and much respect.
 

safetyva

Member
Location
Virginia
References for ADA info

References for ADA info

You also could contact the Occupational Therapist or Social Worker who is involved in the case for the/se individuals. They are a good source for infomation on physical accessibility, resources for references, and may also know some sources for equipment (cabinet storage, etc.)

I recently saw an episode of the Holmes/homes show where he refitted a kitchen and bathroom for a wheelchair-bound women. They installed hydraulic "pull-down" shelving in the upper cabinets, undercounter refrigerator and freezer units, lower sink with no cabinet underneath so her wheelchair would fit, etc.
 

jumper

Senior Member
In addition to the great ideas already mentioned:

Things we did that seem to help being in a wheelchair. Always remember that a person in a wheelchair has to do a lot of tasks from the side for the greatest reach.

36" doors everywhere. Immobile people tend to gain weight and the chair gets bigger.

Interior doors where pocket, not in a corner, so they could always open and close them from the side easily.

Laundry and and dryer not in a corner, accessible from the side.

The kitchen sink idea with no cabinets below.

Cook top in a lower counter for easier access, again not in a corner.

Small wall oven at appropiate height with an alcove next to it for the wheel chair. It gives the person better control putting things in and out, and the door is not in the way.

Sliding baskets in the cabinets.

ADA compliant bathroom is a must. It is the most frustrating area for a wheel chair bound person. The ability to carry out basic hygenics in privacy and ease is essential for mental health and well being.

Transportation, People need to get out.

The best advice I can give is to actually put yourself in a chair and see what it is like. Your perspective from that position will allow to see what it is really like. I did and it really opened my eyes.
 

jumper

Senior Member
Be sure to ask him what his needs are and what abilities he still has. He will probably clue you in on some things you and I wouldn't even think of since we aren't living life in a wheelchair. I suppose you could get a wheelchair a go around looking at things from his point of view. Good luck and much respect.

Spot on advice. I did not see your post and said the same thing.
 

norcal

Senior Member
One idea seen in a big box store cabinet display, was to have a small platform under the DW to raise it a bit, I even like the thought as a non-wheelchair user.
 
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