Algebra work book recommendations.

Merry Christmas
Status
Not open for further replies.

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
In the fall I am going to a class aimed at a "NABCEP" certification.. The info about the class states "Interested participants must possess strong skill in basic algebra and calculations' Well that currently rules me out.

My goal is to change that situation over the next two months. Seeing as they specified basic knowledge I think it is possible I can do that myself.

I was hoping that someone could recommend some good books for beginners. Or any other recommendations, I would like to do well at this class.:smile:


Thanks in advance, Bob
 

cadpoint

Senior Member
Location
Durham, NC
I Googled complex math equations and simple math equations, well that sends one about everywhere, in the simplex search the engineers handbook was mentioned.

I like this one web site cause it presents a lot of words to numbers equation building, practicing and the history is presented where needed.

There is a great glossary, although set up for Teachers, there's a lot to see and do with signing up for anything...

Enjoy

http://www.cut-the-knot.org
 

K8MHZ

Senior Member
Location
Michigan. It's a beautiful peninsula, I've looked
Occupation
Electrician
Hi Bob,

I am curious as to what is considered to be 'basic' algebra?

Algebra is no more than the application of mathematical equations using symbols (usually letters) as variables. This allows for an equation to be written as a line of instruction. That line will allow for the variables to be replaced by actual numbers in order to achieve an answer.

A very simple example would be a+a = 2a.

All that means is that any number added to itself is = to 2 times that number.

The equations get more complex, but algebra is really no more than the above.

Perhaps a sample of what they expect you to know is in order. I am sure that there are many folks here that are whizzes at algebra.

Good Luck!
 

ron

Senior Member
Bob,
I've never had much luck with learning math on my own from a text book. I need practical examples that make it more tangible to me, for me to understand.
Are there any young folks in the family or new to the job site recently out of school that could work with you on actual problems? Algebra could be things that you already know, such as you know power and voltage ratings, what is the amperage.
 

mivey

Senior Member
barnes and noble have a book called "algebra for dummies"
The "Dummies" books and "Idiot's" books are easy reads and would be a good choice if you want a book instead of online options. I'm sure they will cover anything you will run across in your class.
 

Doug S.

Senior Member
Location
West Michigan
Might not be what you wanna hear, but...

Might not be what you wanna hear, but...

Bob,

Like ron, Algebra is one of those things I too have never been able to learn much from a book, alone.

This may take some more work but have you considered the local community college?
I have had great profs. (many are adjunct) while taking night classes. A little homework will ensure you get one of these "teachers".

If you lived my neck of the woods I'd offer to tutor for beer. I'll bet you could find an apprentice who would work for a similar price structure?:D

My 2?
Doug S.
 

George Stolz

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Windsor, CO NEC: 2017
Occupation
Service Manager
I wouldn't get too concerned about it. It's probably just to spook off people who really are atrocious at math. I'd grab just about any textbook to brush up in my spare time.

One thing I discovered - algebra has changed over time, and keeps changing. My mom (in her infinite wisdom) bought an Algebra book from 1892 thinking it was a neat find; but then taught me from it too.

When I returned to high school junior year, and entered Algebra II (which their whiz-bang assessment computer said I was up to) I had an extremely steep curve catching up. Even some of the symbols I had learned from the 1892 text were irrelevant. I managed to pull off an 80%, but barely.
 

brian john

Senior Member
Location
Leesburg, VA
In the fall I am going to a class aimed at a "NABCEP" certification.. The info about the class states "Interested participants must possess strong skill in basic algebra and calculations' Well that currently rules me out.

My goal is to change that situation over the next two months. Seeing as they specified basic knowledge I think it is possible I can do that myself.

I was hoping that someone could recommend some good books for beginners. Or any other recommendations, I would like to do well at this class.:smile:


Thanks in advance, Bob

Bob at our local JC they have a 6 week refresher course on all basic math Algebra, Geometry, pick and choose. The 2nd summer 6 week term just started , the math classes are on line. Check your local JC.

OR get the book they use, it comes with a work book and answers.
 

nakulak

Senior Member
with all the colleges up near you bob, you also might consider hiring a college kid/teaching aid who tutors to give you private lessons so you could fit it in with work ?

or you could buy one of these books, too (not sure if they are any good but I'm sure they have them at the local bookstore or maybe the coop so you could check em out)
51TFdoYwxkL._SL75_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-st,TopRight,8,-14_OU01_.jpg
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
I Googled complex math equations and simple math equations, well that sends one about everywhere, in the simplex search the engineers handbook was mentioned.

I can Google, but the problem is the volume of information that returns, I was trying to narrow it down a bit.

I am curious as to what is considered to be 'basic' algebra?

Me too, honestly I am not even 100% sure what 'Algebra' means.

Good Luck!

Thank you.

Bob,
I've never had much luck with learning math on my own from a text book.

Thats a bummer to hear, I was kind of assuming I could learn on my own from a text book.

Algebra could be things that you already know, such as you know power and voltage ratings, what is the amperage.

I was thinking that as well, I just do not know what they are looking for. I know some of the class has to do with calculating radiance and positions like azimuth etc.

barnes and noble have a book called "algebra for dummies"

I saw that and it has a workbook, it is probably where I am heading but I was wondering if someone here had some direct experience and good luck with a particular book.

The "Dummies" books and "Idiot's" books are easy reads and would be a good choice if you want a book instead of on line options. I'm sure they will cover anything you will run across in your class.

Strangely, as on-line as I am, I think I do better reading from books then the screen.

This may take some more work but have you considered the local community college?

I am not prepared to go to school nights at this time ...... it's summer.

If you lived my neck of the woods I'd offer to tutor for beer. I'll bet you could find an apprentice who would work for a similar price structure?:D

Cool, thanks.

I should mention a member sent me a PM with a very generous offer to teach me one on one. That was very nice but that is much more structured then I want to commit to at this time.


I wouldn't get too concerned about it. It's probably just to spook off people who really are atrocious at math. I'd grab just about any textbook to brush up in my spare time.

That is pretty much what I was figuring but at the same time I don't want to get caught by surprise at this class.


Bob at our local JC they have a 6 week refresher course on all basic math Algebra, Geometry, pick and choose. The 2nd summer 6 week term just started , the math classes are on line. Check your local JC.

OR get the book they use, it comes with a work book and answers.

I don't want to go to 'summer school'.

Thanks everyone, keep any ideas coming.

I am being sent to this class by the company, the least I can do is make the most of it. :smile:
 

brian john

Senior Member
Location
Leesburg, VA
It is not summer school at school you can sit at home and do this. I did this through Calculus II. Just finished a hybrid photography class in school and on line.

I figured I could sit home in the evenings and watch TV or take classes, even my mind can't be damaged by this.

That is pretty much what I was figuring but at the same time I don't want to get caught by surprise at this class.

I decided to try the engineers exam in VA after finishing some classes, I got the study guides and was amazed at how basic the test was. UNTIL i got to page 3 OMG I was soooooo lost.
 
Last edited:

hardworkingstiff

Senior Member
Location
Wilmington, NC
any non engineers remember how to do this?

any non engineers remember how to do this?

SQRT of A(SQRD)+2AB+B(SQRD)


That's about all I remember from algebra. (1968 was the last time I had algebra).
 

hillbilly

Senior Member
Algebra is fun...if you understand it.:)

Approach learning it with a open mind.

You can do it, and be better off for it.:)

You may even get addicted to it.

steve
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Retired Electrical Contractor
Make sure you get a book that is a workbook or has a workbook. I can learn it on my own but it is certainly easier with help. Maybe your kids can help. :grin:
 

R Bob

Senior Member
Location
Chantilly, VA
Bob,

There are a lot of interactive courses available in CD format.
I purchased Math Advantage from Costco to help my son out.
Reasonably priced, lot of useful info, relatively painless, actually kind of fun.
You can complete it at your at you own leisure, and repeat the modules over and over again until your comfortable.

It's not going to make anyone a mathematician, but it's a good start.

Also try Amazon.

Brian's suggestion probably offers similar advantages and it's offered by a reliable/legitimate source.
 

sparkyboys

Senior Member
Location
Columbus, ga
iwire

iwire

you could take a college class on intermediate algebra. it would be a good refresher. many of my friends have done that. it helped them a lot.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top