Arc-Fault protection for gas range

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LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Not any more than a simple toggle switch would, IMPO.
The difference, as I see it, is that the switch arcs circuit conductor to circuit conductor, and is a series arc; but the ignitor arcs to the EGC.

But then, the ignitor no doubt provides for secondary isolation, and is probably not an issue. So, please disregard this train of thought. :cool:
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
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Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Retired Electrical Contractor
Bad design and I would take that gas range off the arc fault even if there is no code violation. You may be sorry later. I would be curious to know if the igniter would cause a problem on the AFCI. If I had a gas range in my house I would try it just out of curiosity.
 

electricmanscott

Senior Member
Location
Boston, MA
Bad design and I would take that gas range off the arc fault even if there is no code violation. You may be sorry later. I would be curious to know if the igniter would cause a problem on the AFCI. .

Impossible. AFCIs have been perfected. There is no way an AFCI would mistake something for anything other than an arc that is about to kill! :roll:
 

cycotcskir

Senior Member
You may also ask the inspector if by "AHJ" he means county/city code or personal unction. If he says city code, then you should get a reference. If not, you'll know he's blowin' smoke.

Are all the new gas ranges equipped with a regulator that is operated electronically? I have an old one where the gas could be turned on without power, but my new one won't flow without power.
 

charlie b

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Seattle, WA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
Perhaps the inspector is my age (translation - "past my sell-by date"):grin: and still remembers gas water heaters without electronic igniters. You had to use a match, and you had to turn the valve in a particular pattern, or it wouldn't ignite the pilot light. If that pilot light were to go out, a small flow of gas could enter the room.
 

guitarsarge

Member
Location
Texas
You may also ask the inspector if by "AHJ" he means county/city code or personal unction. If he says city code, then you should get a reference. If not, you'll know he's blowin' smoke.

Are all the new gas ranges equipped with a regulator that is operated electronically? I have an old one where the gas could be turned on without power, but my new one won't flow without power.

either way the gas regulator is Normally Closed, not open...;) Otherwise every time the power is off the valve would be open:grin:
 

cycotcskir

Senior Member
Perhaps the inspector is my age (translation - "past my sell-by date"):grin: and still remembers gas water heaters without electronic igniters. You had to use a match, and you had to turn the valve in a particular pattern, or it wouldn't ignite the pilot light. If that pilot light were to go out, a small flow of gas could enter the room.

That's exactly what I'm refering to. I must be past my date too. Funny, I thought I was still fairly young :confused: thanks for the bad news charlie:grin:

either way the gas regulator is Normally Closed, not open...;) Otherwise every time the power is off the valve would be open:grin:

Of course, that was the crux of my post. Either way he is wrong, i am only attempting to understand where he is coming from... or should I say "what planet"
 

guitarsarge

Member
Location
Texas
Of course, that was the crux of my post. Either way he is wrong, i am only attempting to understand where he is coming from... or should I say "what planet"

I was agreeing with you:smile:
 
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Buck Parrish

Senior Member
Location
NC & IN
If you put the dinning room on a small appliance circuit in this manner. If you put your gfci at the sink go to other counter outlets, then the gas range, the clock, then the dining room. The whole circuit must be AFCI protected.
 

mlnk

Senior Member
I think the misunderstanding of the Code in this thread is based on the fact that some gas ranges (slide-in) are fixed appliances, others are not attached in place, therefore are considered to be small appliances. Remember that the refrigerator is also considered to be a small appliance. Small appliances shall be energized by the small appliance circuit. An exception is a fixed gas range that may be energized by the small appliance circuit. This means that you do not need a separate circuit for a fixed gas range. The choices are: small appliance circuit or separate circuit. I would fail the hook-up to a bedroom circuit........ Incidentally, good practice is to put the refer on a separate non-GFCI protected circuit or upstream of the GFCI on an other small appliance circuit.
 
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tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
First of all, any gas appilance does not depend on AC to shut off the gas if the pilot light goes out.
Older appilances had a standing pilot, a thermocouple, that when lit, generated a small amout of DC power to energize the gas solenoid. When you light the appilance, you push down the red button to override the solenoid to allow gas out to the pilot light.

Newer ranges have electronic spark igniton or other types that eliminate the standing pilot.
If the AFCI, the gas device won't have power, if electronic the pilot won't light.
But what is important is the gas appilances are fail safe.

Call or have your AHJ call the gas company.
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
There is no pilot at all with most if not all spark ignighted cook-tops.
There is nothing stopping one from leaving the gas on and fiiling the house and go BOOM. I don't know what the inspector problem is.
Again I would not pull the circuit from the bedroom anyway. The counter top circuit is usually nearby. I use that.
 
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