Art. 210.8 New requirements of GFCI protection in dwelling units!

Breakering a panel is becoming more expensive every new code cycle, now we are going to be installing 30amp gfci breakers for dryers and 40-50 amp gfci breakers for ranges if the receptacle is within 6’ of the sink. When’s it going to end? Soon there will be no regular type breaker in a branch circuit panel board in residential installations! They will all be some form of fci breaker, maybe even the main breaker at some point!
 

Another C10

Electrical Contractor 1987 - still at it ..
Breakering a panel is becoming more expensive every new code cycle, now we are going to be installing 30amp gfci breakers for dryers and 40-50 amp gfci breakers for ranges if the receptacle is within 6’ of the sink. When’s it going to end? Soon there will be no regular type breaker in a branch circuit panel board in residential installations! They will all be some form of fci breaker, maybe even the main breaker at some point!
I'm sure it will get to the point of the Main being GFI and AFCI, It sure would eliminate revising the GFI/AFCI circuit protection every 6 months, not really a problem to troubleshoot a single branch problem when all one would have to do it flip each branch breaker on until the Main trips, then isolate the problem circuit accordingly. Besides it would probably also cost less to just protect 1 Main Breaker instead of buying dozens of a variety of ratings. Just a thought.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Main breaker being a GFCI will not work so well, not so much because it kills everything when it trips but if you have all your circuits connected to it, you have that many more feet of conductors for capacitive leakage, a reason a GFCI breaker sometimes wont work on a single circuit that is a long circuit and is better to have the protection closer to the end where the protection is actually required.
 

ActionDave

Moderator
Staff member
I would be fine with all GFPE in a house, I think it makes good sense. I do not like the new GFCI requirements, I hope more states start writing their own amendments.
 

charlie b

Moderator
Staff member
. . . now we are going to be installing 30 amp gfci breakers for dryers and 40-50 amp gfci breakers for ranges if the receptacle is within 6’ of the sink.
I don't have the 2020 yet, but this surprises me extremely. What are they afraid of, that someone will accidently drop the dryer into the sink?
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
I don't have the 2020 yet, but this surprises me extremely. What are they afraid of, that someone will accidently drop the dryer into the sink?

Thats not all.

210.8 Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection for Personnel.
Ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel shall be provided as required in 210.8(A) through (F). The ground-fault circuit interrupter shall be installed in a readily accessible location.
Informational Note No. 1: See 215.9 for ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel on feeders.
Informational Note No. 2: See 422.5(A) for GFCI requirements for appliances.
Informational Note No. 3: See 555.9 for GFCI requirements for boat hoists.
Informational Note No. 4: Additional GFCI requirements for specific circuits and equipment are contained in Chapters 4, 5, and 6.
For the purposes of this section, when determining the distance from receptacles the distance shall be measured as the shortest path the supply cord of an appliance connected to the receptacle would follow without piercing a floor, wall, ceiling, or fixed barrier, or the shortest path without passing through a window.
210.8(A) Dwelling Units.
All 125-volt through 250-volt receptacles installed in the locations specified in 210.8(A)(1) through (A)⁠(11) and supplied by single-phase branch circuits rated 150 volts or less to ground shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.
  1. (1)
    Bathrooms
  2. (2)
    Garages and also accessory buildings that have a floor located at or below grade level not intended as habitable rooms and limited to storage areas, work areas, and areas of similar use
  3. (3)
    Outdoors
    Exception to (3): Receptacles that are not readily accessible and are supplied by a branch circuit dedicated to electric snow-melting, deicing, or pipeline and vessel heating equipment shall be permitted to be instal⁠led in accordance with 426.28 or 427.22, as applicable.

  4. (4)
    Crawl spaces — at or below grade level
  5. (5)
    Basements
    Exception to (5): A receptacle supplying only a permanently installed fire alarm or burglar alarm system shall not be required to have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection.
    Informational Note: See 760.41(B) and 760.121(B) for power supply requirements for fire alarm systems.

    Receptacles installed under the exception to 210.8(A)⁠(5) shall not be considered as meeting the requirements of 210.52(G).
  6. (6)
    Kitchens — where the receptacles are installed to serve the countertop surfaces
  7. (7)
    Sinks — where receptacles are installed within 1.8 m (6 ft) from the top inside edge of the bowl of the sink
  8. (8)
    Boathouses
  9. (9)
    Bathtubs or shower stalls — where receptacles are instal⁠led within 1.8 m (6 ft) of the outside edge of the bathtub or shower stall
  10. (10)
    Laundry areas
    Exception to (1) through (3), (5) through (8), and (10): Listed locking support and mounting receptacles utilized in combination with compatible attachment fittings installed for the purpose of serving a ceiling luminaire or ceiling fan shall not be required to be ground-fault circuit-interrupter protected. If a general-purpose convenience receptacle is integral to the ceiling luminaire or ceiling fan, GFCI protection shall be provided.

  11. (11)
    Indoor damp and wet locations
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Other Than Dwelling

210.8(B) Other Than Dwelling Units.
All 125-volt through 250-volt receptacles supplied by single-phase branch circuits rated 150 volts or less to ground, 50 amperes or less, and all receptacles supplied by three-phase branch circuits rated 150 volts or less to ground, 100 amperes or less, installed in the locations specified in 210.8(B)(1) through (B)(12) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.
  1. (1)
    Bathrooms
  2. (2)
    Kitchens or areas with a sink and permanent provisions for either food preparation or cooking
  3. (3)
    Rooftops
    Exception: Receptacles on rooftops shall not be required to be readily accessible other than from the rooftop.

  4. (4)
    Outdoors
    Exception No. 1 to (3) and (4): Receptacles that are not readily accessible and are supplied by a branch circuit dedicated to electric snow-melting, deicing, or pipeline and vessel heating equipment shall be permitted to be installed in accordance with 426.28 or 427.22, as applicable.
    Exception No. 2 to (4): In industrial establishments only, where the conditions of maintenance and supervision ensure that only qualified personnel are involved, an assured equipment grounding conductor program as specified in 590.6(B)(2) shall be permitted for only those receptacle outlets used to supply equipment that would create a greater hazard if power is interrupted or having a design that is not compatible with GFCI protection.

  5. (5)
    Sinks — where receptacles are installed within 1.8 m (6 ft) from the top inside edge of the bowl of the sink
    Exception No. 1 to (5): In industrial laboratories, receptacles used to supply equipment where removal of power would introduce a greater hazard shall be permitted to be installed without GFCI protection.


    Exception No. 2 to (5): Receptacles located in patient bed locations of Category 2 (general care) or Category 1 (critical care) spaces of health care facilities shall be permitted to comply with 517.21.

  6. (6)
    Indoor damp and wet locations
  7. (7)
    Locker rooms with associated showering facilities
  8. (8)
    Garages, accessory buildings, service bays, and similar areas other than vehicle exhibition halls and showrooms
  9. (9)
    Crawl spaces — at or below grade level
  10. (10)
    Unfinished areas of basements
    Exception to (1) through (5), (8), and (10): Listed locking support and mounting receptacles utilized in combination with compatible attachment fittings installed for the purpose of serving a ceiling luminaire or ceiling fan shall not be required to be ground-fault circuit-interrupter protected. If a general-purpose convenience receptacle is integral to the ceiling luminaire or ceiling fan, GFCI protection shall be provided.

  11. (11)
    Laundry areas
  12. (12)
    Bathtubs and shower stalls — where receptacles are installed within 1.8 m (6 ft) of the outside edge of the bathtub or shower stall


210.8(C) Crawl Space Lighting Outlets.
GFCI protection shall be provided for lighting outlets not exceeding 120 volts installed in crawl spaces.
210.8(D) Specific Appliances.
Unless GFCI protection is provided in accordance with 422.5(B)(3) through (B)(5), the outlets supplying the appliances specified in 422.5(A) shall have GFCI protection in accordance with 422.5(B)(1) or (B)(2).
Where the appliance is a vending machine as specified in 422.5(A)(5) and GFCI protection is not provided in accordance with 422.5(B)(3) or (B)(4), branch circuits supplying vending machines shall have GFCI protection in accordance with 422.5(B)(1) or (B)(2).
210.8(E) Equipment Requiring Servicing.
GFCI protection shall be provided for the receptacles required by 210.63.
210.8(F) Outdoor Outlets.
All outdoor outlets for dwellings, other than those covered in 210.8(A)(3), Exception to (3), that are supplied by single-phase branch circuits rated 150 volts to ground or less, 50 amperes or less, shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.
Exception: Ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection shall not be required on lighting outlets other than those covered in 210.8(C)
https://nec2020.nfpa.org/code/eb61ef8f-b559-487b-8499-9f0b11e56c6d/463bba44-7758-420d-9060-6c7e40d0fd5a/2fad65ee-2541-4b45-82b0-a26d759243c1/np_eff5447e-7ca4-11e9-b18c-f700bda2dd08.html#ID000700011381
 

electrofelon

Senior Member
I admit I have not thoroughly researched it, but I have heard there is no significant documented history of problems behind these recent and upcoming GFCI requirements. Drives me crazy. Try to put in a proposal to delete theses requirements later and the CMP will say " .....has not provided any evidence....". 😠😠😠
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
I have taught code update classes since the 96 NEC. For every new code I would say "There are more GFCI requirements" I thought with the 2014 and 2017 codes there were no more locations left for GFCI, I was wrong.
I will be rewiring an existing outdoor heat pump unit and I will pull my permit before the 2020 NEC is adopted in Washington (July 1, 2020)
 

shortcircuit2

Senior Member
There is an ongoing problem with unqualified people putting supply cords on ranges and dryers...incorrectly. I think the issue revolves around deliveries from appliance and home stores, with the unqualified delivery driver putting the cords on. One incident may have contributed to the death of a plumber in NH.

Dishwashers require GFCI because of problems with them starting fires.
 

ramsy

Senior Member
There is an ongoing problem with unqualified people putting supply cords on ranges and dryers...incorrectly. I think the issue revolves around deliveries from appliance and home stores, with the unqualified delivery driver putting the cords on. One incident may have contributed to the death of a plumber in NH.

Dishwashers require GFCI because of problems with them starting fires.
Yes, some of us correct unqualified work, and remove extenstion cord fire hazards for a living.

Just repaired this one today. See before and after photos.

Mickey Mouse electrical range connection missing lug terminals.

#6 conductors squeezed behind locknut failed to operate appliance
Lucky it didn't arc, and destroy the brand new appliance.
 

Attachments

kwired

Electron manager
There is an ongoing problem with unqualified people putting supply cords on ranges and dryers...incorrectly. I think the issue revolves around deliveries from appliance and home stores, with the unqualified delivery driver putting the cords on. One incident may have contributed to the death of a plumber in NH.

Dishwashers require GFCI because of problems with them starting fires.
Which should have been resolved with product recalls. GFCI won't do anything for the many that were installed without GFCI because they were replacements or not inspected for various reasons.
 
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