bonding gas in residential

jamesjacco

Member
Location
ormond beach fl.
Occupation
electrician
OK I have always bonded gas for residential at the entrance point. Then I also bond with the size wire for the circuit that is also servicing the equipment at the back side of the gas shut off valve. also should be noted that the gas lines, once inside these houses, is csst flexible stainless steel piping. first time ever I had an inspector tell me I need to run a # 10 wire from each piece of equipment back to the panel. some runs are at least 100 to 150 feet. please let me know what you think. I have researched everywhere and the only thing about bonding these csst pipe is there is an investigation going on due to csst having small leaks ( holes ) possibly from near by lightning strikes. everything I have read is vague except for bonding the rigid gas lines. as far as residential there is very little literature ( that I can find ) on this subject. thank you
 

texie

Senior Member
Location
Fort Collins, Colorado
Occupation
Electrician, Contractor, Inspector
I'd tell the inspector to go pound sand. That is an absurd and unreasonable requirement completely made up and not supported by the NEC. If you have CSST you need to bond it per manufacturers instructions. Any other bonding for gas piping required by the NEC is accomplished automatically thru the EGC serving the appliances.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
I agree with texie and I believe that some brands of CSST do not require any additional bonding.
 

Ohms law

Senior Member
Location
Sioux Falls,SD
Correct me if I'm wrong this is a mechanical code, is it not? At least it is in my area it is and is not our concern. If I remember right the yellow csst did require a bonding jumper from the appliance to the ufer or water pipe. This is why all mechanical contractors stopped using this stuff and started using the black flexible gas pipe.

I'm sure I'm missing some information.

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Ohms law

Senior Member
Location
Sioux Falls,SD
OK I have always bonded gas for residential at the entrance point. Then I also bond with the size wire for the circuit that is also servicing the equipment at the back side of the gas shut off valve. also should be noted that the gas lines, once inside these houses, is csst flexible stainless steel piping. first time ever I had an inspector tell me I need to run a # 10 wire from each piece of equipment back to the panel. some runs are at least 100 to 150 feet. please let me know what you think. I have researched everywhere and the only thing about bonding these csst pipe is there is an investigation going on due to csst having small leaks ( holes ) possibly from near by lightning strikes. everything I have read is vague except for bonding the rigid gas lines. as far as residential there is very little literature ( that I can find ) on this subject. thank you
This is what I found.


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Rdcowart

Member
Location
North Carolina
I work for a company that does all three trades. I have Taken the ccst class and in class we learned that the new ccst that is being installed doesn’t have to be bonded. The only time it needs to be is if there is the yellow ccst piping. What we do here is we run a #6 or #4 from a bonding bridge that is connected to the ground wire for the ground rods to the closest piece of black steel gas piping we can find. If the gas meter is close to the bonding bridge we connect to the customer side of the gas meter. In Nc if we change or up grade a service they make us bond it if there is the yellow ccst. I believe the inspector is wrong about running #10 back to the panel for each piece of equipment.
 
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LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
The code says that the EGC of the circuit supplying the equipment is all that is required. The reason for bonding the supply side of any CSST is to minimize current on the CSST because the load side of the CSST is expected to be bonded.
 
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