BR rejection plate removing!

AC\DC

Senior Member
Location
Florence,Oregon,Lane
Occupation
EC
Hello I ordered a BR quad 30-20 from my Eaton reb for a BR panel. I got one from them and it had a rejection plate( or clip can’t remember). I said it won’t fit with that on my older BR panel. He tells me to just Pop it out!

He tells me that is how they come,every one pops them out.
Call Eaton they tell me it will void warranty!
Told him to send me one without it!
He ended up sending me a new one without the clips. So wondering if any of you guys have removed them? I tried Removing it, just to see how easy and blew the breaker apart.
 

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Another C10

Electrical Contractor 1987 - present
Location
Southern Cal
Occupation
Electrician NEC 2020
I tried Removing it, just to see how easy and blew the breaker apart.
It's worth the wait to have them send you the correct breaker. I wouldn't suggest modifying a breaker because they usually do end up being damaged not to mention, now its obvious the breaker was altered beyond design.
 

PhenixFord

Member
Location
Cabot, AR.
Occupation
Industrial Systems and Controls
I've removed them with only slight damage to the casing.

I've also hack-sawed the foot on Square-D Homeline (I think) breakers.
 

norcal

Senior Member
Can also hacksaw a notch in the bus stab, have seen that stunt before and just as ill advised as the breaker mod discussed above.
 

PhenixFord

Member
Location
Cabot, AR.
Occupation
Industrial Systems and Controls
I’ve done it like maybe 10 years ago when I was an apprentice. Now that I’m The one that can get sued I’m paranoid
Yea, I know it isn't the right thing to do. But I sure enjoyed defeating their little proprietary nuances.

I've got many years of "Service" under my belt. Never seen one fail.
 

Another C10

Electrical Contractor 1987 - present
Location
Southern Cal
Occupation
Electrician NEC 2020
I'd like to ad on this in that aside from the breaker seating snugly on the buss fin or being kept from slopping around while engaged within the supports, I'm pretty sure a 20 amp breaker is a 20 amp breaker regardless who makes it, The argument of it's forbidden and a criminal act to interchange breakers, I know its more about liability but as far as performance of thermal protection, a breaker is going to trip at its thermal rating regardless the manufacturer. That's my thought anyway. Granted, I do my best to assure the breaker I put in a panel is designed for the panel.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Technically it is a tandem style breaker and is providing two output poles on each input pole.

Back when there still was the 42 circuit rule this was a bigger deal, though they must have figured out it really wasn't that big of a deal when they removed the 42 circuit rule.

Any tandem or twin breaker that doesn't have rejection features for a panel slot not intended to accept it is likely not CTL rated. Some designs are easier to "cheat" than others.

This generally only an issue with older panels as it wasn't too long after the 42 circuit rule disappeared that nearly all panels available are designed to accept tandems on ever breaker connection point from what I have noticed.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I've removed them with only slight damage to the casing.

I've also hack-sawed the foot on Square-D Homeline (I think) breakers.
Probably wa QO, their rejection feature is in the foot, Homeline rejection feature is similar to many other 1 inch wide breakers and there is a notch in the bus where a tandem is allowed to be installed.
 

Another C10

Electrical Contractor 1987 - present
Location
Southern Cal
Occupation
Electrician NEC 2020
Technically it is a tandem style breaker and is providing two output poles on each input pole.
Technically each fin of a 100 Amp panel is rated for 100 A. , granted the entire A or B phase is also rated at the same 100 A rating. I always explain to clients wondering how much power their 100 A Panel really has, I tell them well .. technically you have 100 Amps of a 220 v supply or 200 A of a 120 v supply, that always seems to help their perspective, or explain the available pressure as one would with sprinklers, you can only operate so many zones at a time. you can have 50 zones.

Sorry off topic ..
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Technically each fin of a 100 Amp panel is rated for 100 A. , granted the entire A or B phase is also rated at the same 100 A rating. I always explain to clients wondering how much power their 100 A Panel really has, I tell them well .. technically you have 100 Amps of a 220 v supply or 200 A of a 120 v supply, that always seems to help their perspective, or explain the available pressure as one would with sprinklers, you can only operate so many zones at a time. you can have 50 zones.

Sorry off topic ..
Not that I disagree but my comment was geared more towards number of overcurrent devices allowed in the panel and not how many amps each "slot" can handle. This issue sort of went away when NEC removed the 42 circuit rule, but older panels still have listing and instructions that limite them to whatever they were designed for. Like I said, most panels today will accept a tandem/twin in every position where that was only likely at one time with a panel with 20 or less positions and the reason you used to see a lot of "30/40" designed ones.
 
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