Can I use sheet metal screws to put a panel cover on?

Merry Christmas

Can I use sheet metal screws to put a panel cover on?

  • Only the manufactures supplied hardware?

    Votes: 78 40.8%
  • Any short machine screw that fits?

    Votes: 88 46.1%
  • Sheet-metal screws?

    Votes: 9 4.7%
  • Tek-Screws?

    Votes: 5 2.6%
  • Nail it on with Ramset?

    Votes: 9 4.7%
  • Why would I put the cover on?

    Votes: 14 7.3%

  • Total voters
    191
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steve66

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
Engineer
You have to use the manufacturer's screw for the one hole on the panel that isn't stripped out.

You can use anything for the second screw that is just pushed throught the hole to keep the cover from swinging from the first screw.

Steve
 

jwjrw

Senior Member
Added: I'd have to say that it's not specified, but if I had to nake the decision, I'd say factory or equivalent. So, B.



I rarely see factory-threaded holes like the ones troughs and wireways usually come with for their covers.

Typically, for most panels without captive hardware, the cover screws form the threads the first time they're installed.

Bingo! But the hub holes are. Thats why I said it would be ok here, Hub NO!
 

Jim W in Tampa

Senior Member
Location
Tampa Florida
Based on i don't want a red tag on a final over something like this i would use a machine screw if i lost the ones that came with it. Sheet metal screws could easily cut into a wire. Now depending on the inspector i simply would not give him a reason to tag. Few would turn down machine screws if right size.
 

mivey

Senior Member
Based on i don't want a red tag on a final over something like this i would use a machine screw if i lost the ones that came with it. Sheet metal screws could easily cut into a wire. Now depending on the inspector i simply would not give him a reason to tag. Few would turn down machine screws if right size.
Most screws can easily cut into the wire. If you have a wire pressed against the screw hole, you have other problems besides using the perfect screw.

That said, I dress the screw ends when needed. Lineman's and some exposed concrete works wonders.
 

jwjrw

Senior Member
OK Alex, I'll take Grounding and Bonding 250.8(A)(6) for a hundred. :confused:

Since when are panel screws considered "grounding conductors or a "bonding jumper" ? Im in 2008 and I dont believe they are either.

If the panel cover required bonding would it not have to have it from the factory to get a UL label?
 
Since when are panel screws considered "grounding conductors or a "bonding jumper" ? Im in 2008 and I dont believe they are either.

If the panel cover required bonding would it not have to have it from the factory to get a UL label?


I can see it now in the next code revision................

Bonding jumpers on all metal covers including receptacles and switches.

This will make manufactures squirm with delight.

Next will be arc flash protection required to operate any toggle switch.

Edit: I voted Ramset.
 

marti smith

Senior Member
firstly 250.4(3) then 250.8(5) One could say 250.8(6) if those in the picture are machine screws, but alas for me, they are self-tappers and they do not create a secure bond IMHO and I won't use them. I know that once there was a 32 threads per inch point, which is why most if not all threads used in bonding are 32 tpi, but I can't find it today.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Again based on what?:)

I have never seen an instruction that said 'use our hardware'
Based on the originals are what they are because the manufacturer chose them. Nothing more, but what's a good reason for using a sharp screw?

Many instructions don't specify having to use supplied parts, but we don't always have carte blanche to substitute anything we happen to have handy.
 

electricmanscott

Senior Member
Location
Boston, MA
firstly 250.4(3) then 250.8(5) One could say 250.8(6) if those in the picture are machine screws, but alas for me, they are self-tappers and they do not create a secure bond IMHO and I won't use them.

Oh really? I dare you to attach a jumper from a 200 amp main breaker to the panel cover secured with those screws. Now close the breaker.
 

nhfire77

Senior Member
Location
NH
Iwire,

You can do whatever you want . I cannot understand why people would put two in and leave the rest in the bottom of the can. Seen it more than a few times.


I will use sheet metal screws, if I have to, and I know I can get away with it :)
 

jaylectricity

Senior Member
Location
Massachusetts
Occupation
licensed journeyman electrician
Iwire,

You can do whatever you want . I cannot understand why people would put two in and leave the rest in the bottom of the can. Seen it more than a few times.

I'll do that when working on a job that will require me to open the panel a few more times before the job is done. All screws get installed before I leave for the last time.
 

K2500

Senior Member
Location
Texas
Since when are panel screws considered "grounding conductors or a "bonding jumper" ? Im in 2008 and I dont believe they are either.

If the panel cover required bonding would it not have to have it from the factory to get a UL label?

Would you consider the panel cover likely to become energized?

I would, and if i were installing something that was in a gray area between NEMA, UL, and the NEC, I would choose NEC.
 
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