Can somebody ANSWER this??

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troymac

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I have a question about a transformer installation that I am dealing with a local football field. The existing transformers are being replaced and the owner wants the system to remain as it is for financial reasons. The pole mounted transformer is 4160/2400v to 480/240v single phase. The lighting is 240v quartz. What they have done is taken the secondary 480v, single phase conductors to a panel at the top of the pole and also a center tapped conductor(at the pole mounted transformer) to the neutral bus of the panel. A ground rod at the base of the pole has a ground conductor that connects to the ground bus of the panel. The neutral bus and ground bus are tied together in the panel. They are then feeding the lights with 240v single phase (one hot, one neutral). I am assuming they are doing this with a 277v, single phase circuit breaker in the panel. This is at the first pole. The other 2 poles on the same side of the field are feed with 480v, single phase (2 hot, 1 center tapped grounded neutral) tapped at the secondary of the transformer on the first pole. There is a ground rod at each pole that connects to the ground the panel at each pole. Each panel at each pole has the neutral and ground tied together so that each pole is a separate service. I have never heard of a transformer being used like this. Is this code compliant. I cant find anything that says it is. The electrician doing the job has never seen this before either. Please help me ASAP.
 

hornetd

Senior Member
Location
Maryland
Re: Can somebody ANSWER this??

I don't see anything wrong with the installation as described unless the location of the service disconnecting means at the top of the pole is a problem. The only differences between your installation and a row of houses supplied by a utility transformer are the secondary voltage and that the loads are located on the poles instead of in a building at the end of a service drop or lateral.
--
Tom
 
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