Class 1, Class 2 circuits.

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
To OPs question:

No, don’t classify it. The motor load is chapter 4 special equipment which modifies chapter 3 general wiring.

Classes 1-3 are for power limited circuits under chapter 7. Review section 90 in NEC. Chaptersi 1-3 cover general requirements. Chapters 4-6 cover special situations that modify chapters 1-3. Chapter 7 takes an entirely different approach. You IGNORE everything in chapters 1-6 unless chapter 7 specifically calls for it. As a general rule you cannot mix chapter 1-3 and chapter 7 wiring. As a general rule of thumb about the only loads you can mix are lighting loads.

Nothing OP describes falls outside general purpose wiring. It’s one thing when someone wants to run an Ethernet cable in a conduit with a couple lights. It’s quite another to be running it with power wiring and that’s what the rules captur

To OPs question:

No, don’t classify it. The motor load is chapter 4 special equipment which modifies chapter 3 general wiring.

Classes 1-3 are for power limited circuits under chapter 7. Review section 90 in NEC. Chaptersi 1-3 cover general requirements. Chapters 4-6 cover special situations that modify chapters 1-3. Chapter 7 takes an entirely different approach. You IGNORE everything in chapters 1-6 unless chapter 7 specifically calls for it. As a general rule you cannot mix chapter 1-3 and chapter 7 wiring. As a general rule of thumb about the only loads you can mix are lighting loads.

Nothing OP describes falls outside general purpose wiring. It’s one thing when someone wants to run an Ethernet cable in a conduit with a couple lights. It’s quite another to be running it with power wiring and that’s what the rules capture.
Right and Class 1 wiring can only be run with power wiring if its functionally related. Example would be start stop wiring in the same conduit as the power wiring to a motor
 

DrSparks

The Everlasting Know-it-all!
Location
Madison, WI, USA
Occupation
Master Electrician and General Contractor
I find that a bit far fetched. While technically CAT5 is rated 300V, 22ga would make it good for about .7A in a multi-core cable. So assuming 277V max., that's less than 200W and even with LED, I don't think a 200W fixture would be much of a "high bay" light source. I also don't think you would find an AHJ that would allow it to be used for 277V, or even 120V for that matter. If they were thinking 48VDC to make is "low voltage", the current is the same, so now we are talking a 33W LED fixture...
The system I was referring to is 48 VDC. Not sure on the specifics. Or how many fixtures per run. I just remember each fixture accepts 2 CAT 5 cables in parallel.

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Dsg319

Senior Member
Location
West Virginia
Occupation
(Green)Master Electrician
class 1 control circuit. 120volt to a float back to a ice cube relay for start/stop operations. Would it be considered current carrying conductor, and be stuck with ampacity adjustments?
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
class 1 control circuit. 120volt to a float back to a ice cube relay for start/stop operations. Would it be considered current carrying conductor, and be stuck with ampacity adjustments?
class 1 circuits are not required to have ampacity adjustments until you get 30 conductors in a raceway.
 
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