class 1 div 2

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stev11

Member
Location
india
hi

what is the code or standard that will tell us the suitable fan construction or materials that will be suitable for class 1 div 2 location or hazardous locations ??


thank alot
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
hi

what is the code or standard that will tell us the suitable fan construction or materials that will be suitable for class 1 div 2 location or hazardous locations ??


thank alot

It is likely that the fan itself can be made out of whatever materials are normal for such a fan.

The motor would need to meet the requirements for a C1D2 area. Take a look at article 501.
 

stev11

Member
Location
india
It is likely that the fan itself can be made out of whatever materials are normal for such a fan.

The motor would need to meet the requirements for a C1D2 area. Take a look at article 501.
I see many ex proof manufactures use fans with AMCA type A,B or C but I dont which one is suitable for each hazardouse location. Is there any clear referance or standerd???
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
I see many ex proof manufactures use fans with AMCA type A,B or C but I dont which one is suitable for each hazardouse location. Is there any clear referance or standerd???

XP is not required in a D2 area.

IMO it is mostly a design choice in a D2 area.

Keep in mind a D2 area is one where the area is hazardous only in the event of some kind of unlikely failure for very short periods of time. The chance of the fan creating a spark either from static buildup or by a sparking material striking something that might cause a spark is at the same time that the area becomes hazardous is pretty low.

Having said that, this seems like something that would best be looked at by a competent someone intimately familiar with the actual application, and not by a passerby on the Internet.

the materials the fan itself is made of is not covered by the NEC, only the electrical part of the fan.
 

rbalex

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Mission Viejo, CA
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Professional Electrical Engineer
First, I appreciate the question; it has caused me to investigate an area I haven't been too concerned about in over 45 years.

Second, I want to endorse Bob's comments and add a few of my own.

  1. AMCA 99-0401 is an ANSI sanctioned Standard. As such, in most US jurisdictions, including most "overseas" locations covered by US sovereignty, Fed or local OSHA can enforce it. However, as Bob mentioned, selection of AMCA Type A, B or C fan designs in a manufacturer's design choice and AMCA 99-10 is a manufacturing not a general application standard. I also note it isn't referenced in NEMA MG-1. Engineering specifies the Class, Division, Group and T-class of the installation/application as required by NEC Section 500.8 ,especially 500.8(B) and (C). Remember, engineering rarely specifies manufacturing details beyond certain performance requirements. We usually aren't qualified.
  2. Unlike IEC installations, in US jurisdictions, electrical area classification, is just that; it does not cover mechanical equipment. If other disciplines choose to use the area classification for other purposes, that's fine but the electrical equipment selection remains the same.
  3. Section 501.125(B) is comprehensive about motor electrical requirements in Class I, Division 2. It doesn't speak to the mechanical requirements. FPN/IN No. 3 references IEEE Std. 1349 an application guide. It is not an ANSI document and is largely ignored - except by UL, who has been trying to get motors listed for Division 2 for decades (a few are, but ultimately Section 501.125(B) is all that is necessary).

One AMCA manufacture has an interesting link about fan classifications including a further link to "the explosion proof fan myth."

Now that I've gone through the exercise, I'm grateful for the education - and I'm still not concerned.
 
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