combo afci gfci breaker instead of gfci breaker

dhsvcs

Member
Is there any reason I can't use a gfci/afci combo breaker, such as in a bathroom, instead of a gfci breaker except cost and nuisance trips ?
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
Combo is the term for an older style afci/gfci used around 2005.
You will want a dual function type.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
As Tom stated the terminology is important because combination type is for both series and parallel arc's, not dual function AFCI/GFCI protection.
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
As Tom stated the terminology is important because combination type is for both series and parallel arc's, not dual function AFCI/GFCI protection.
One of the reasons for the confusion on the term "combination type" is that prior to the currently required AFCI that provides protection for both series and parallel arcs, one manufacture had an AFCI/GFCI (branch circuit/feeder type AFCI) device that was called a "combination" type.
 
Is there any reason I can't use a gfci/afci combo breaker, such as in a bathroom, instead of a gfci breaker except cost and nuisance trips ?
AFCI protection not required for bathroom receptacles! Yes, a dual function breaker is going to cost more than a regular gfci breaker, so just install a regular gfci receptacle. It’s cost is much less than a breaker providing the same function plus you won’t have to run out to your panel every time the breaker trips!
 

AC\DC

Member
I like using AFCI/GFCI breakers. They cost me the same as a GFCI breaker. And I like knowing were all the GFCI are going to be located. Its a pain in the garage when they stack stuff from floor to ceiling.

I think it has been two years since i last triped a GFCI at my house. I just checked them about a month ago
 

electrofelon

Senior Member
I like using AFCI/GFCI breakers. They cost me the same as a GFCI breaker. And I like knowing were all the GFCI are going to be located. Its a pain in the garage when they stack stuff from floor to ceiling.

I think it has been two years since i last triped a GFCI at my house. I just checked them about a month ago
I have started using dual functions a lot lately. I used to strive to avoid putting anything on a GFCI that wasnt required to be, I guess because I was paranoid of nuisance trips, but Ive gotten over it. Of course with nearly everything requiring AFCI anyway, added the DF when also needed is easier and cheaper than using a jiffy recep.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Aren't DF's usually a little less price than a GFCI only breaker for most of you?

My guess is volume pricing because of more demand for dual function where this is happening.
 

charlie b

Moderator
Staff member
Alright, raise your hands if you're bathroom GFCI has tripped in the last year.
It's been a long time since any GFCI tripped at my house. However, the AFCI receptacle that the electrician installed about 4 years ago for a new outlet serving the newly installed gas fireplace has tripped at least twice a season. Also, we have had numerous trips of the dual unit AFCI/GFCI breakers that the electrician installed during our kitchen remodel last year. The AFCI installation was a city code requirement. My conclusion: GFCI good, AFCI bad.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Oops sorry misread your post. Thought you meant "....less than AFCI and GFCI recep"
Just checked I guess depends on which brand you use, but for most part dual function are maybe 4-5 dollars higher than AFCI only, but GFCI only is about same price for dual function. Homeline GFCI was lower than the DF on HD, others were about same.
 
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