Cord connected fixture

ptonsparky

Senior Member
Location
NE (9.06 miles @5.9 Degrees from Winged Horses)
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
I am not following you, more details needed.
Could be why I haven't figured out the answer myself...I'm not asking the right question.

We used a cord to connect a fixture on a project and am wondering if I am required to use a receptacle and cord end above it, or if I use a receptacle, that it must be directly above the fixture. The later, I believe, but I would like the code reference(s).
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
Could be why I haven't figured out the answer myself...I'm not asking the right question.

We used a cord to connect a fixture on a project and am wondering if I am required to use a receptacle and cord end above it, or if I use a receptacle, that it must be directly above the fixture. The later, I believe, but I would like the code reference(s).
Without cracking my book I would say it is an option to do so but not required.

Consider a cord hung pendent fixture in a home. No receptacle.

I will go crack a book now.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Without cracking my book I would say it is an option to do so but not required.

Consider a cord hung pendent fixture in a home. No receptacle.

I will go crack a book now.
A majority of those cord hung pendants though the cord ends in a canopy that is still considered a part of the luminaire.

I think Tom is asking more along the lines of something like a cheap "shop lite" that has a cord and plug for supply.
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
Start at 400.

400.7 Uses Permitted.
(A) Uses.
Flexible cords and cables shall be used only for
the following:

(1) Pendants

(2) Wiring of luminaires
OK, now

(B) Attachment Plugs. Where used as permitted in
400.7(A)(3), (A)(6), and (A)(8), each flexible cord shall
be equipped with an attachment plug and shall be energized
from a receptacle outlet or cord connector body.

We are under (A)(2) so (B) does not apply.

Looks like no plug needed.

How about 410?

410.62 Cord-Connected Lampholders and Luminaires.
(A) Lampholders.
Where a metal lampholder is attached to
a flexible cord, the inlet shall be equipped with an insulating
bushing that, if threaded, is not smaller than metric designator
12 (trade size 3⁄8) pipe size. The cord hole shall be of a size
appropriate for the cord, and all burrs and fins shall be
removed in order to provide a smooth bearing surface for
the cord.

Bushing having holes 7 mm (9⁄32 in.) in diameter shall be
permitted for use with plain pendant cord and holes 11 mm
(13⁄32 in.) in diameter with reinforced cord.

(B) Adjustable Luminaires. Luminaires that require adjusting
or aiming after installation shall not be required to
be equipped with an attachment plug or cord connector,
provided the exposed cord is of the hard-usage or extrahard-
usage type and is not longer than that required for maximum
adjustment. The cord shall not be subject to strain or
physical damage.

(C) Electric-Discharge and LED Luminaires.

(1) Cord-Connected Installation.
A luminaire or a listed
assembly shall be permitted to be cord connected if the
following conditions apply:

(1) The luminaire is located directly below the outlet or
busway.

(2) The flexible cord meets all the following:

a. Is visible for its entire length outside the luminaire

b. Is not subject to strain or physical damage

c. Is terminated in a grounding-type attachment plug
cap or busway plug, or is a part of a listed assembly
incorporating a manufactured wiring system connector
in accordance with 604.6(C), or has a luminaire
assembly with a strain relief and canopy having
a maximum 152 mm (6 in.) long section of
raceway for attachment to an outlet box above a
suspended ceiling

(2) Provided with Mogul-Base, Screw Shell Lampholders.
Electric-discharge luminaires provided with mogulbase,
screw shell lampholders shall be permitted to be connected
to branch circuits of 50 amperes or less by cords
complying with 240.5. Receptacles and attachment plugs
shall be permitted to be of a lower ampere rating than the
branch circuit but not less than 125 percent of the luminaire
full-load current.

(3) Equipped with Flanged Surface Inlet. Electricdischarge
luminaires equipped with a flanged surface inlet
shall be permitted to be supplied by cord pendants
equipped with cord connectors. Inlets and connectors
shall be permitted to be of a lower ampere rating than the
branch circuit but not less than 125 percent of the luminaire
load current

Wow, kind of long but I am sticking with no plug required.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Bob has the section you were looking for in post 6.

(C)(1)(1) answers your specific question of where the receptacle needs to be, and from what I read in there the cord must end in a cord cap or busway plug.
 
still confused about flexible cords

still confused about flexible cords

Hi everyone, i would like to revisit this conversation for a few minutes if i may, During a recent safety audit at my plant, the discussion about using flexible cords to supply power to luminaires came into question. As i looked at the each luminaire (high bay), i did notice that while they all used SO cord for the final length of wire, some were hard wired into the junction box and some used a plug and receptacle. That's when i took to the NEC and became even more confused..... Article 400.7(A)(2) states that i am allowed to use flexible cord to wire luminaires and Article 400.7(B) tells me that no attachment plug is required for said luminaires, everything seems straight forward...... EXCEPT..... Article 410.24(A) confirms that i am allowed to use a flexible cord AS PERMITTED IN 410.62(B) OR 410.62(C). 410.62(C)(1)(1) says the Luminaire must be directly below the OUTLET and 410.62(C)(1)(2)(c) says that the flexible cord must be terminated in a grounding-type attachment plug cap or busway plug.

I have searched the internet and this forum for some clarification, one Article says no, and the other says yes. Do these Luminaires with flexible cord need to have a plug and receptacle? Is flexible cord hard wired into the junction box acceptable? Any help with this would be greatly appreciated.

Many Thanks, Keith
 

ptonsparky

Senior Member
Location
NE (9.06 miles @5.9 Degrees from Winged Horses)
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Hi everyone, i would like to revisit this conversation for a few minutes if i may, During a recent safety audit at my plant, the discussion about using flexible cords to supply power to luminaires came into question. As i looked at the each luminaire (high bay), i did notice that while they all used SO cord for the final length of wire, some were hard wired into the junction box and some used a plug and receptacle. That's when i took to the NEC and became even more confused..... Article 400.7(A)(2) states that i am allowed to use flexible cord to wire luminaires and Article 400.7(B) tells me that no attachment plug is required for said luminaires, everything seems straight forward...... EXCEPT..... Article 410.24(A) confirms that i am allowed to use a flexible cord AS PERMITTED IN 410.62(B) OR 410.62(C). 410.62(C)(1)(1) says the Luminaire must be directly below the OUTLET and 410.62(C)(1)(2)(c) says that the flexible cord must be terminated in a grounding-type attachment plug cap or busway plug.

I have searched the internet and this forum for some clarification, one Article says no, and the other says yes. Do these Luminaires with flexible cord need to have a plug and receptacle? Is flexible cord hard wired into the junction box acceptable? Any help with this would be greatly appreciated.

Many Thanks, Keith
As I understand it. IF you use a receptacle for the fixture it must be directly above the fixture. The receptacle is not required, just the location if you use one.
 

Electrobe

Member
Based on 412.62(C) I would say that a plug is required. also based on a flexible cord not being a substitute for permanent wiring if you are hardwiring this installation another wiring method should be used like MC or flex, not a cord.
 
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