Different conductors in meter base.

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Hv&Lv

Senior Member
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Engineer/Technician
Can anyone lead me to the code articles that tell me that different conductors cannot be used in a service entrance.
I was at a house today and noticed that the service entrance had been changed out. There was a new meterbase, with new 4/0 alum. in pvc going up the side of the house to the point of attachment. In the meter base on the load side, there was the original #2 copper going to the original 60 amp fusebox in the house.
For some reason this just doesn't look right, but I can't seem to put my finger on the specific articles that dissallow it.
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
Are you saying The line side of the meter is one type and the load side is different?

I see no issue here.
For example here in Ca most utilities supply the underground wire which is usually smaller than one can use in the Service. It is also Al and I use copper.
I just don't see the issue.
 

masterinbama

Senior Member
We do that a lot on storm damage. POCO makes us use a 2.5" conduit so I will upsell a little and convince the owner that a 200 amp meter and mast is a very minor amount of money. That way they can upgrade the panel a little later and already have the mast and meter bought and set.

The cost difference from a 100 to a 200 only involves the 30' feet of wire and and the socket. Less than $50 with AL wire.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
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yes. But the line side is run up the side of the house to the point of delivery, which is at the top of the mast. This would make the 4/0 aluminum riser a part of NEC regulations instead of NESC as the underground riser you are talking about. We also run underground to meterbases everyday as you are explaining. But in this instance all the wire is under NEC regulations. I was just curious since the 4/0 aluminum is capable of carrying more that the #2 if the wires should be the same.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
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Occupation
Engineer/Technician
I should have also noted that the new meter base is a 200 amp.
 

masterinbama

Senior Member
The main in the 60 amp panel still protects the #2 that leaves the meter. You could drop parallel 500 CU's to the top of the meter and the main would still protect the #2 @ 60 amps
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Pretend you had a VD problem on a circuit. You would run a larger wire and connect to the smaller. Not a problem-- the meter is just a connection point and as long as the load is covered by the #2 there should be no issue.
 

augie47

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Tennessee
Occupation
State Electrical Inspector
It is fairly common here to have a meter base fed with 2/0 or 3/0 and a #6 going to a 60 amp loadcenter on the load side.
The E/Cs do so in order to use the existing riser in the future when the load necessitates.
An example is someone wanting a RV receptacle but with plans to build a home later and use the same riser.
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
I still don't see the issue. Where I work the riser is a POCO issue
Some POCO's may be different.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I still don't see the issue. Where I work the riser is a POCO issue
Some POCO's may be different.
If POCO is the one installing it then it is a POCO issue. If the contractor is installing it then he has to follow applicable codes. Some POCO could still have rules that go beyond the code before they will connect it to their system.
 
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