dryer outlet

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jimbo123

Senior Member
I am getting a new dryer and it going from a 3 wire to 4 wire . WE have 208 volts and the dryer will be 230 volts . I believe I am alright but I like to make sure.
Thanks for you help.
 

cpal

Senior Member
Location
MA
not sure what your question is. Is the dryer a 230 V dryer? and is the outlet on a system @208????

you may need a boost transformer?
 
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augie47

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Tennessee
Occupation
State Electrical Inspector (Retired)
I am getting a new dryer and it going from a 3 wire to 4 wire .
Meaning your existing outlet is __?__ wire ?
. WE have 208 volts and the dryer will be 230 volts . I believe I am alright but I like to make sure.
Thanks for you help.

It will heat at about 2/3 what it would if operated on 230 so you need to make allowance on drying time.
 

kbsparky

Senior Member
Location
Delmarva, USA
The problem with using a booster transformer in this instance is the line to neutral voltage can end up with 135+Volts, and that will wreck havoc with your blower motor and/or controls.

No booster transformer needed. Since the motor and controls operate on 120 Volts, those items will function normally without it.

The heating element will operate at 25% less wattage, however. If your dryer has a 5000 watt element, it will consume 3750 watts during operation. This means it will take longer to dry a wet load of clothes.

IF you find that the drying time is unacceptable, you might be able to replace the element with one rated specifically at 208 Volts, that will provide the full output wattage at the lower voltage.
 

norcal

Senior Member
Many dryer (& ranges for that matter) are dual rated for a 120/240V or 120/208V supply they just have a lower KW w/ 208V. rating as said prev., just read the data plate on the appliance to confirm if it is or not.
 

LawnGuyLandSparky

Senior Member
I am getting a new dryer and it going from a 3 wire to 4 wire . WE have 208 volts and the dryer will be 230 volts . I believe I am alright but I like to make sure.
Thanks for you help.

Do NOT go to a 4-wire dryer plug. If your existing receptacle is 3-wire, that's fine just get a new 3-wire cord & plug for your new dryer. The 4-wire requirement is code for new dryer/range receptacle installations, not a new appliance installation.
 

mcclary's electrical

Senior Member
Location
VA
Do NOT go to a 4-wire dryer plug. If your existing receptacle is 3-wire, that's fine just get a new 3-wire cord & plug for your new dryer. The 4-wire requirement is code for new dryer/range receptacle installations, not a new appliance installation.



Why would you say DO NOT,,,,,do something safer,,,I can see you say you may not have to,,,but don't say DO NOT . Especially when we all know it's safer
 

LawnGuyLandSparky

Senior Member
Why would you say DO NOT,,,,,do something safer,,,I can see you say you may not have to,,,but don't say DO NOT . Especially when we all know it's safer

Because 2 recent experiences have taught me that HD clerks and appliance salespeople are seriously misinformed about the code change and how it affects existing installations. They are telling buyers of new appliances it is a "must do" code change, and it is not.

A 30a 240v GFCI breaker would also be a "safer" way to protect a clothes dryer, is this part of every sales shpeil as well?
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Why would you say DO NOT,,,,,do something safer,,,I can see you say you may not have to,,,but don't say DO NOT . Especially when we all know it's safer
It's not safer if the existing circuit is 3-wire and is re-used. He was saying that the cord should match the circuit.
 

Volta

Senior Member
Location
Columbus, Ohio
Because 2 recent experiences have taught me that HD clerks and appliance salespeople are seriously misinformed about the code change and how it affects existing installations. They are telling buyers of new appliances it is a "must do" code change, and it is not.

A 30a 240v GFCI breaker would also be a "safer" way to protect a clothes dryer, is this part of every sales shpeil as well?

No, but it is still permitted to install the dryer circuits without GFCI protection (at least for a few more years :roll:).

But it is no longer permited to install NEMA 10-30 receptacle outlets on new circuits when a grounded conductor is used. The reason is that it is considered unsafe to bond the non-current carrying metal parts of an appliance to the grounded conductor load of the service. (yeah, I know you know this).

That is why you shouldn't tell someone NOT to perform this upgrade, just point out that it isn't required while replacing the appliance, but it is not safe enough to install it that way anymore.
 

B4T

Senior Member
Since nobody asked..

Since nobody asked..

How do you have 208V??

Do you live in a old commercial building that was renovated?

I never worked in an apartment building, but I would think 240V would be standard because of electric stoves and dryers heating faster
 

Cavie

Senior Member
Location
SW Florida
Receptical must match the circuit. 4 wire recep on a 3 wire circuit gives a false sence of security. The next owner will assume it is done correctly.
 

B4T

Senior Member
Receptical must match the circuit. 4 wire recep on a 3 wire circuit gives a false sence of security. The next owner will assume it is done correctly.

I have wired many dryers with 10/3 plain.. no ground.

That is how it was done for many years till the 4wire code change.

HD should not let the delivery guys install these appliances and hire a licensed electrician
 
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