Electric toilet seat

Status
Not open for further replies.

JEI

Member
Location
CA
I ran into a problem in San Francisco. I put the toilet seat outlet on the bathroom gfi circuit. The inspector is telling me it needs to be on a dedicated. The electrical rating on the seat is 835 watts. Then it says when the water valve is 32 degrees it uses 1400 watts. It will never be frozen. I also asked what if we take the seat off? Then they want the wire out. Is it against code to have an outlet behind the toilet ? What's code? I've always done it this way in the past and never ran into an issue. The supervisor won't budge. Saying some code and title 24 issue. I'm not getting it. I will always run a dedicated now because the bath is done, and on the middle floor. Costing me a lot to fix.
 

ActionDave

Chief Moderator
Staff member
Location
Durango, CO, 10 h 20 min without traffic from wing
Occupation
Licensed Electrician
I ran into a problem in San Francisco. I put the toilet seat outlet on the bathroom gfi circuit. The inspector is telling me it needs to be on a dedicated. The electrical rating on the seat is 835 watts. Then it says when the water valve is 32 degrees it uses 1400 watts. It will never be frozen. I also asked what if we take the seat off? Then they want the wire out. Is it against code to have an outlet behind the toilet ? What's code? I've always done it this way in the past and never ran into an issue. The supervisor won't budge. Saying some code and title 24 issue. I'm not getting it. I will always run a dedicated now because the bath is done, and on the middle floor. Costing me a lot to fix.
There is nothing in the NEC that says you can't have a recpt behind your toilet. I don't know what title 24 would say.

210.23 is the best I can come up with for having a dedicated circuit. Equipment fastened in place can't take up more than 50% of a circuit that shares other outlets.
 

ceb58

Senior Member
Location
Raeford, NC
You sure this is not a Japanese innovation?;)

I wired one for a Japanese couple. This one took 2 - 20 amp dedicated circuits. 1 circuit was for the heated seat the other was to a computer/ analyzer/ display. When you pee in it you could push a button and it would analyze the urine for blood sugar levels .
They both had diabetes and this was a better way than sticking your self. The toilet only cost $20,000.00.
 

edward

Senior Member
Location
CA
Occupation
Electronologist
I ran into a problem in San Francisco. I put the toilet seat outlet on the bathroom gfi circuit. The inspector is telling me it needs to be on a dedicated. The electrical rating on the seat is 835 watts. Then it says when the water valve is 32 degrees it uses 1400 watts. It will never be frozen. I also asked what if we take the seat off? Then they want the wire out. Is it against code to have an outlet behind the toilet ? What's code? I've always done it this way in the past and never ran into an issue. The supervisor won't budge. Saying some code and title 24 issue. I'm not getting it. I will always run a dedicated now because the bath is done, and on the middle floor. Costing me a lot to fix.

1. The reason he wants you to remove the wire is because as soon as he leaves you will put the seat back ON. But as others have mentioned there is no code issue by having a receptacle behind the seat.

2. Did you ask him to show a code section where it prohibits this install.

3. Did you ask him what the title 24 issue is?

Also San Francisco has their own amendments to the NEC. Maybe he is citing the local code. You need to ask for a code section. Before you do any tear out go to the city and ask to see a code section, and if they give you any study it, understand it and see if it even makes sense to your install.
Just because they give you a code section it does not mean it applies to your install.

Good luck.
 

JEI

Member
Location
CA
There is nothing in the NEC that says you can't have a recpt behind your toilet. I don't know what title 24 would say.

210.23 is the best I can come up with for having a dedicated circuit. Equipment fastened in place can't take up more than 50% of a circuit that shares other outlets.

I haven't had a chance to look it up. Title 24 says you can't have a heater on with the bath gfi circuit, that's what the inspectors supervisor said... It gets even more stupid. The inspector and supervisor want me to fish a wire from the 15 amp lighting circuit for the toilet. I wish I could name names.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I haven't had a chance to look it up. Title 24 says you can't have a heater on with the bath gfi circuit, that's what the inspectors supervisor said... It gets even more stupid. The inspector and supervisor want me to fish a wire from the 15 amp lighting circuit for the toilet. I wish I could name names.
Does it say or mean "space heaters" or does it mean "any" heater. If it means "any" heater then the hair dryers, curling irons, straighteners and so on would not be allowed either - which is one major reason the 20 amp bath circuit is required in the first place.
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
I haven't had a chance to look it up. Title 24 says you can't have a heater on with the bath gfi circuit, that's what the inspectors supervisor said... It gets even more stupid. The inspector and supervisor want me to fish a wire from the 15 amp lighting circuit for the toilet. I wish I could name names.

Title 24 is all of CA building codes. Most refer to title 24 just being the energy code. There is nothing in the Energy code prohibiting a heater on the Bath circuit. The only thing could be the load being greater than 50%.

A whole lotta nothing. If only the receptacle in on this 20 amp circuit at the basin then the inspector is being unreasonable.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Title 24 is all of CA building codes. Most refer to title 24 just being the energy code. There is nothing in the Energy code prohibiting a heater on the Bath circuit. The only thing could be the load being greater than 50%.

A whole lotta nothing. If only the receptacle in on this 20 amp circuit at the basin then the inspector is being unreasonable.

There could be 30 receptacles in that bathroom and inspector is still unreasonable if none of them supply equipment fastened in place, and if fastened in place need to be over 50% of the branch circuit rating.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top