emergency lighting

retire09

Senior Member
Is a light fixture with a built in emergency battery and ballast considered "unit equipment" the same as a wall pack?
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
A light fixture is defined in the definition of equipment. So yes a wall pack and an emergency light would be considered equipment but I am not sure where you are going with this.
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
I imagine he is intrested in 700.12(E) or (F) depending on code cycle.

But I don't know the answer to his question, I suspect he is correct but am not sure.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
I imagine he is intrested in 700.12(E) or (F) depending on code cycle.

But I don't know the answer to his question, I suspect he is correct but am not sure.

Thanks, I was wondering what this was about. BTW- it is 700.12(F). I think of a wall pack as not having battery backup up but if it did would it not be considered unit equipment?

(F) Unit Equipment.
(1) Components of Unit Equipment. Individual unit
equipment for emergency illumination shall consist of the
following:
(1) A rechargeable battery
(2) A battery charging means
(3) Provisions for one or more lamps mounted on the
equipment, or shall be permitted to have terminals for
remote lamps, or both
(4) A relaying device arranged to energize the lamps automatically
upon failure of the supply to the unit
equipment
 

qcroanoke

Sometimes I don't know if I'm the boxer or the bag
Location
Roanoke, VA.
Occupation
Engineering
3) Provisions for one or more lamps mounted on the
equipment, or shall be permitted to have terminals for
remote lamps, or both


Does a flourescent troffer emergency light have provisions for remote lamps?


or OP is questioning the use of flexible cord and plug as acceptable installation method.
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
3) Provisions for one or more lamps mounted on the
equipment, or shall be permitted to have terminals for
remote lamps, or both


Does a flourescent troffer emergency light have provisions for remote lamps?
I have not seen one with remote capabilities but that is permitted not required.
 

retire09

Senior Member
The question is for the application of NEC 2011 700.12(F) exception #1 allowing for a separate circuit for unit equipment.
 

qcroanoke

Sometimes I don't know if I'm the boxer or the bag
Location
Roanoke, VA.
Occupation
Engineering
The question is for the application of NEC 2011 700.12(F) exception #1 allowing for a separate circuit for unit equipment.
It is allowed but only if there are 3 or more circuits serving the area and it cannot be interrupted by walls. In other words one big room.
If not they must be on the lighting circuit serving the area.
 

Cincycaddy

Member
Location
Cincinnati, OH
It is allowed but only if there are 3 or more circuits serving the area and it cannot be interrupted by walls. In other words one big room.
If not they must be on the lighting circuit serving the area.
Although allowed, would it be considered bad design to have emergency lighting on a separate circuit than adjacent general lighting? If the general lighting circuits drop but the emergency lighting circuit does not, emergency lights won't trip on.
 

qcroanoke

Sometimes I don't know if I'm the boxer or the bag
Location
Roanoke, VA.
Occupation
Engineering
Although allowed, would it be considered bad design to have emergency lighting on a separate circuit than adjacent general lighting? If the general lighting circuits drop but the emergency lighting circuit does not, emergency lights won't trip on.
To me it would be.
We do shelters in poco substations and they have a kiniption "some of them" when we insist on putting the emergency lights on the lighting circuit.
 

steve66

Senior Member
The question is for the application of NEC 2011 700.12(F) exception #1 allowing for a separate circuit for unit equipment.
I'm not sure if I understand the question, but if it helps, the definition of unit equipment is basically in the 1st four or five sentences of 700.12(F).

Although allowed, would it be considered bad design to have emergency lighting on a separate circuit than adjacent general lighting? If the general lighting circuits drop but the emergency lighting circuit does not, emergency lights won't trip on.
The odds of having 3 breakers in a panel trip or loose power, while still having power through a 4th breaker for the emergency lights is pretty low.

Although I do notice they don't say anything about which phases the circuits are on - I think it would be very bad design to put the 3 circuits all on the same phase, and put the emergency lights on another phase.
 
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